All Posts

Sorted by Magic (New & Upvoted)

September 2019

Frontpage Posts
Shortform [Beta]
50elityre4moNew post: Some things I think about Double Crux and related topics I've spent a lot of my discretionary time working on the broad problem of developing tools for bridging deep disagreements and transferring tacit knowledge. I'm also probably the person who has spent the most time explicitly thinking about and working with CFAR's Double Crux framework. It seems good for at least some of my high level thoughts to be written up some place, even if I'm not going to go into detail about, defend, or substantiate, most of them. The following are my own beliefs and do not necessarily represent CFAR, or anyone else. I, of course, reserve the right to change my mind. [Throughout I use "Double Crux" to refer to the Double Crux technique, the Double Crux class, or a Double Crux conversation, and I use "double crux" to refer to a proposition that is a shared crux for two people in a conversation.] Here are some things I currently believe: (General) 1. Double Crux is one (highly important) tool/ framework among many. I want to distinguish between the the overall art of untangling and resolving deep disagreements and the Double Crux tool in particular. The Double Crux framework is maybe the most important tool (that I know of) for resolving disagreements, but it is only one tool/framework in an ensemble. 2. Some other tools/ frameworks, that are not strictly part of Double Crux (but which are sometimes crucial to bridging disagreements) include NVC, methods for managing people's intentions and goals, various forms of co-articulation (helping to draw out an inchoate model from one's conversational partner), etc.In some contexts other tools are substitutes for Double Crux (ie another framework is more useful) and in some cases other tools are helpful or necessary compliments (ie they solve problems or smooth the process within the Double Crux frame).In particular, my personal conversational facilitation repertoire is about 60%
34romeostevensit4moA service where a teenager reads something you wrote slowly and sarcastically. The points at which you feel defensive are worthy of further investigation.
27jp4moDo Anki while Weightlifting Many rationalists appear to be interested in weightlifting. I certainly have enjoyed having a gym habit. I have a recommendation for those who do: Try studying Anki cards [https://twitter.com/michael_nielsen/status/957763229454774272?lang=en] while resting between weightlifting sets. The upside is high. Building the habit of studying Anki cards is hard, and if doing it at the gym causes it to stick, you can now remember things by choice not chance. And the cost is pretty low. I rest for 90 seconds between sets, and do about 20 sets when I go to the gym. Assuming I get a minute in once the overheads are accounted for, that gives me 20 minutes of studying. I go through about 4 cards per minute, so I could do 80 cards per visit to the gym. In practice I spend only ~5 minutes studying per visit, because I don't have that many cards. I'm not too tired to concentrate. In fact, the adrenaline high makes me happy to have something mentally active to do. Probably because of this, it doesn't at all decrease my desire to go to the gym. I find I can add simple cards to my Anki deck at the gym, although the mobile app does make it slow. Give it a try! It's cheap to experiment and the value of a positive result is high.
26habryka4moWHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF KARMA? LessWrong has a karma system, mostly based off of Reddit's karma system, with some improvements and tweaks to it. I've thought a lot about more improvements to it, but one roadblock that I always run into when trying to improve the karma system, is that it actually serves a lot of different uses, and changing it in one way often means completely destroying its ability to function in a different way. Let me try to summarize what I think the different purposes of the karma system are: Helping users filter content The most obvious purpose of the karma system is to determine how long a post is displayed on the frontpage, and how much visibility it should get. Being a social reward for good content This aspect of the karma system comes out more when thinking about Facebook "likes". Often when I upvote a post, it is more of a public signal that I value something, with the goal that the author will feel rewarded for putting their effort into writing the relevant content. Creating common-knowledge about what is good and bad This aspect of the karma system comes out the most when dealing with debates, though it's present in basically any karma-related interaction. The fact that the karma of a post is visible to everyone, helps people establish common knowledge of what the community considers to be broadly good or broadly bad. Seeing a an insult downvoted, does more than just filter it out of people's feeds, it also makes it so that anyone who stumbles accross it learns something about the norms of the community. Being a low-effort way of engaging with the site On lesswrong, Reddit and Facebook, karma is often the simplest action you can take on the site. This means its usually key for a karma system like that to be extremely simple, and not require complicated decisions, since that would break the basic engagement loop with the site. PROBLEMS WITH ALTERNATIVE KARMA SYSTEMS Here are some of the most common alternatives to our current
23Ruby4moSelected Aphorisms from Francis Bacon's Novum Organum I'm currently working to format Francis Bacon's Novum Organum [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novum_Organum] as a LessWrong sequence. It's a moderate-sized project as I have to work through the entire work myself, and write an introduction which does Novum Organum justice and explains the novel move of taking an existing work and posting in on LessWrong (short answer: NovOrg is some serious hardcore rationality and contains central tenets of the LW foundational philosophy notwithstanding being published back in 1620, not to mention that Bacon and his works are credited with launching the modern Scientific Revolution) While I'm still working on this, I want to go ahead and share some of my favorite aphorisms from is so far: Bacon sees the unaided human mind as entirely inadequate for scientific progress. He sees for the way forward for scientific progress as constructing tools/infrastructure/methodogy to help the human mind think/reason/do science. Bacon repeatedly hammers that reality has a surprising amount of detail [http://johnsalvatier.org/blog/2017/reality-has-a-surprising-amount-of-detail] such that just reasoning about things is unlikely to get at truth. Given the complexity and subtlety of nature, you have to go look at it. A lot. Anticipations are what Bacon calls making theories by generalizing principles from a few specific examples and the reasoning from those [ill-founded] general principles. This is the method of Aristotle and science until that point which Bacon wants to replace. Interpretations is his name for his inductive method which only generalizes very slowly, building out slowly increasingly large sets of examples/experiments. I read Aphorism 28 as saying that Anticipations have much lower inferential distance since they can be built simple examples with which everyone is familiar. In contrast, if you build up a theory based on lots of disparate observation that isn't universal,
Load More (5/134)