(cont.) I guess it is likely true that more people find about neoreaction on LessWrong than vice versa. However, it is not obvious to me that hardly anyone would even join LessWrong to discuss LW topics after being exposed to neoreaction first. I mean, MoreRight recommends its readers to read LessWrong and SlateStarCodex as well. Xenosystems has LW, SSC and OvercomingBias on its blogroll. Radish Magazine's list of the people they admire includes Eliezer Yudkowsky. Obviously some of those people were LWers themselves, some might post links to LessWrong because they try to make their place more comfortable to LWers who might wander there. But still, I hope that at least some neoreactionaries would come here with an interest in LW topics (cognitive biases, future of humanity and artificial intelligence). I guess that it is probably true that neoreaction gains more members from LW than vice versa. This is the community layer. But there is also the intellectual toolbox layer. And I think that if LessWrong started discussing politics, having a few neoreactionaries (not just any neoreactionaries, but those who think in LW terms, are able to notice cognitive biases) here would probably be beneficial. And I guess that if we are to overcome biases we will have to deal with politics. You see, I fear that by paying attention only to cognitive biases that are easy to test in the lab we are like a proverbial drunk man searching for his keys under a lamp-post. For example, field of cognitive biases researches what happens inside a person's head, but certain things from political science and economics such as median voter's theorem, Duverger's law and Motte-and-Bailey effect (when instead of happening inside a person's head, it happens to a movement - when different people from the same movement occupy motte and bailey (I think that individual and group motte-and-bailey's are quite distinct)), seems to be analogous enough so as to be thought of as yet another kind of biases that prevent from optimal decision making at a group level. And if we were to start discussion about things like these, it would be hard to avoid using political examples altogether. By the way, the idea that the list of biases LessWrong usually talks about is not exhaustive enough has already been discussed here.

So even if we try having rational debates about politics, I would prefer to try them on some other political topics.

Yes, definitely. I think that the political topics (especially at the beginning) would have to be much more specific and less related to the questions of identity.

Motte-and-Bailey effect (when instead of happening inside a person's head, it happens to a movement - when different people from the same movement occupy motte and bailey (I think that individual and group motte-and-bailey's are quite distinct))

This could just as easily be described, with the opposite connotation, as the movement containing some weakmans*, which makes me think that we need a better way of talking about this phenomenon. 'Palatability spread' or 'presentability spread'? But that isn't quite right. A hybrid term like 'mottemans' and 'baile... (read more)

Open thread, Nov. 17 - Nov. 23, 2014

by MrMind 1 min read17th Nov 2014329 comments

4


If it's worth saying, but not worth its own post (even in Discussion), then it goes here.

Notes for future OT posters:

1. Please add the 'open_thread' tag.

2. Check if there is an active Open Thread before posting a new one. (Immediately before; refresh the list-of-threads page before posting.)

3. Open Threads should be posted in Discussion, and not Main.

4. Open Threads should start on Monday, and end on Sunday.