So would you get angry if a sabre-toothed tiger charged at you when you weren't expecting it? Do you get angry when a clear day gives way to rain? Do you get angry when a short story has a twist ending?

Expectations not being fulfilled doesn't necessarily cause anger. It may lead to sadness, or laughter, or fear, or disappointment, or any number of emotions. But it normally only leads to anger when the frustrated expectation is about social rules.

So would you get angry if a sabre-toothed tiger charged at you when you weren't expecting it? Do you get angry when a clear day gives way to rain? Do you get angry when a short story has a twist ending?

For me at least, the answers are no, yes, and no respectively. We can further refine the prior hypothesis by stipulating that the bad feelings arise from expectations not being fulfilled in an unpleasurable way, which would stop it from generating the third situation as an example. As for the first, perhaps one might experience anger if it were not being ... (read more)

4Good_Burning_Plastic5yFWIW, Salemicus::anger ("how dare you!") and annoyance feel slightly but not very different to my System 1, much more similar to each other than, say, the various feelings that English labels as "love", and I don't normally feel the need of using different words for the two unless I want to be pedantic. I realize that anger is supposed to be what "They offered me a lousy offer in this Ultimatum game so I'd better turn it down even if I CDT::will be worse off otherwise people TDT::would continue to make me similarly lousy offers" feels from the inside, but my System 1 has only a vague understanding of that, let alone of the fact that unanimate objects aren't actually playing Ultimatum with me (and I can't be alone on this last point otherwise no-one would have ever hypothesised that lightning came from Zeus), but YMMV. BTW, are you two native English speakers? (FTR I'm not.) This might be a case of languages labeling feeling-space differently, rather than or as well as people's feeling-spaces being different.
0[anonymous]5yMy intuitive answer would be yes, but now I am realizing that for me sadness or fear is probably much closer to anger than for you. In my mind they all are "feel bad, be unhappy and express it too". I suppose if we define anger in a very granular and precise way and not just as a general bad feeling, "being mad at" but more like, giving a long rant, it can only apply to humans because I will swear to the rain but only briefly, to let steam out, I will not give a long angry rant to it. I will be "mad at it", but not angry in that social sense that is clear. Halfway conceded: anger in the very granular sense only applies to humans. But. Can you think of a counter-example where 1) humans violate our expectations 2) but it is no a social rule or cohesion violation, and do we get angry or not? This is very tricky, because our expectations are, of course, based on social rules! Usually. Now I am searching for a case when not.

Rationality Quotes Thread March 2015

by Vaniver 1 min read2nd Mar 2015235 comments

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Another month, another rationality quotes thread. The rules are:

  • Please post all quotes separately, so that they can be upvoted or downvoted separately. (If they are strongly related, reply to your own comments. If strongly ordered, then go ahead and post them together.)
  • Do not quote yourself.
  • Do not quote from Less Wrong itself, HPMoR, Eliezer Yudkowsky, or Robin Hanson. If you'd like to revive an old quote from one of those sources, please do so here.
  • No more than 5 quotes per person per monthly thread, please.
  • Provide sufficient information (URL, title, date, page number, etc.) to enable a reader to find the place where you read the quote, or its original source if available. Do not quote with only a name.