I feel like the center often shifts as I learn more about a topic (because I develop new interests within it). The questions I ask myself are more like "How embarrassed would I be if someone asked me this and I didn't know the answer?" and "How much does knowing this help me learn more about the topic or related topics?" (These aren't ideal phrasings of the questions my gut is asking.)

Those seem like good questions to ask as well. In particular, the second one is something I ask myself although, similar to you, in my gut more than verbally. I also deal with the "center shifting" by revising cards aggressively if they no longer match my understanding. I even revise simple phrasing differences when I notice them. That is, if I repeatedly phrase the answer to a card one way in my head and have it phrased differently on the actual card, I'll change the card.

In my experience, I often still forget things I've entered into Anki either because the card was poorly made or because I didn't add enough "surrounding cards" to cement the knowledge. So I've shifted away from this to thinking something more like "at least Anki will make it very obvious if I didn't internalize something well, and will give me an opportunity in the future to come back to this topic to understand it better instead of just having it fade without detection".

I think both this and the original motivational factor I described apply for me.

I'm confused about what you mean by this. (One guess I have is big-O notation, but big-O notation is not sensitive to constants, so I'm not sure what the 5 is doing, and big-O notation is also about asymptotic behavior of a function and I'm not sure what input you're considering.)

You're right. Sorry about that... I just heinously abuse big-O notation and sometimes forget to not do it when talking with others/writing. Edited the original post to be clearer ("on the order of 10").

I think there are few well-researched and comprehensive blog posts, but I've found that there is a lot of additional wisdom the spaced repetition community has accumulated, which is mostly written down in random Reddit comments and smaller blog posts. I feel like I've benefited somewhat from reading this wisdom (but have benefited more from just trying a bunch of things myself).

Interesting, I've perused the Anki sub-reddit a fair amount, but haven't found many posts that do what I'm looking for, which is both give good guidelines and back them up with specific examples. This is probably the closest thing I've read to what I'm looking for, but even this post mostly focuses on high level recommendations and doesn't talk about the nitty-gritty such as different types of cards for different types of skills. If you've saved some of your favorite links, please share!

I agree that trying stuff myself has worked better than reading.

For myself, I've considered writing up what I've learned about using Anki, but it hasn't been a priority because (1) other topics seem more important to work on and write about; (2) most newcomers cannot distinguish been good and bad advice, so I anticipate having low impact by writing about Anki; (3) I've only been experimenting informally and personally, and it's difficult to tell how well my lessons generalize to others.

Regarding other topics being more important, I admit I mostly wrote up the above because I couldn't stop thinking about it rather than based on some sort of principled evaluation of how important it would be. That said, I personally would get a lot of value out of having more people write up detailed case reports of how they've been using Anki and what does/doesn't work well for them that give lots of examples. I think you're right that this won't necessarily be helpful for newcomers, but I do think it will be helpful for people trying to refine their practice over long periods of time. Given that most advice is targeted at newcomers, while the overall impact may be lower, I'd argue "advice for experts" is more neglected and more impactful on the margin.

Regarding takeaways not generalizing, this is why I think giving lots of concrete examples is good because it basically makes your claims reproducible. That is, someone can go out and try what you described fairly easily and see if it works for them.

NaiveTortoise's Short Form Feed

by NaiveTortoise 1 min read11th Aug 201885 comments

In light of reading Hazard's Shortform Feed -- which I really enjoy -- based on Raemon's Shortform feed, I'm making my own. There be thoughts here. Hopefully, this will also get me posting more.