All of Jemist's Comments + Replies

Your Dog is Even Smarter Than You Think

I more meant "keeping around cognitive machinery which is capable of this" without making use of it. Given that wild wolves use (relatively) simple hunting strategies which do not seem to rely on much communication, there doesn't seem to be much need to have a brain capable of communicating relatively abstract thoughts. That doesn't seem to affect your core argument though

Good point about autistic humans who can't learn sign language though, I hadn't considered that. I guess my model of autism was more like:

"Autism affects the brain in lots of different wa... (read more)

2ChristianKl1dI would expect that moving fast running fast through a dense forest does take a lot of cognition to know where to go effectively. Terrain knowledge gets likely also used.
Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Mitochondria Part 3: Predictions and Retrospective

Perhaps I am being too confident in it. I didn't have time to cite sources but the biology of AD seems to be a microcosm of the biology of ageing overall, and EET-A has shown a bunch of random unconnected benefits in mouse models (regenerating blood vessels after a heart attack etc.). 

I do not know how I would obtain it (one would probably need free access to a chemical lab to synthesize it, just looking at EET and other analogues they seem relatively synthesize-able) as for dosing I would dose at comparable ppm levels to the rodent models.

I did 3 sep... (read more)

Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Mitochondria Part 2: Glucose Metabolism

Thanks for the feedback!

  1. You may be right there, and I would certainly be pleased to hear of any projects like this.
  2. I believe the model could work without it, but AD seems to be an attractive state that many human brains fall into with various genetic associations. The main evidence for it is that mutations in Aβ precursor protein can have very high penetrance (i.e. everyone who has the mutation develops early-onset AD  (https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11920-000-0061-z.pdf). You are definitely right that I was too specific in my assessme
... (read more)
Your Dog is Even Smarter Than You Think

If this turns out to be basically true, then what about wild wolves? I think there is a strong case that the capacity for this sort of communication to have been bred into domestic dogs as a result of humans selecting for e.g. better overall intelligence and ability to understand human commands.

Another option is that wild wolf packs have the capacity for this sort of communication but don't (unless we've simply not noticed it) and this seems much less likely to me, for the sole reason that being able to communicate in this way would give a very large advan... (read more)

5ChristianKl1dHumans who learn to drive cars have amazing cognitive machinery for it despite not being evolved for it. The human brain being able to edit the sense of time when driving cars seems pretty amazing. Similar things go for reading. The ability of brains to learn is very general. Given that the buttons work for autistic humans who are not capable of learning sign language learning to use them is likely less cognitively demanding then learning to use sign language.
Most Analogies Are Wrong

Good point, perhaps my view is skewed as I do almost all of my learning and explaining in technical fields (mostly chemistry and biology) and with people who are on a similar knowledge level to me. I can imagine that in a situation of trust but little knowledge (e.g. I am explaining my work to a family member) or in a different field to mine they would be more useful.

I think my assessment here may have been too focussed on a specific subset of analogy use, which I did not properly specify in the post.

Edit to clarify: I still believe intuition pumps in philosophy are a bad sort of analogy in that they are too easily manipulated to serve the philosophical interests of the speaker

D&D.Sci II: The Sorceror's Personal Shopper

Red or green weapons i.e. swords, longswords, battleaxes (not axes or hammers though) seem to have a mana scaling dependent on their +n modifier (although green weapons have a drop-off at higher modifiers. It appears to be a clear enough pattern that it's not a statistical artefact. I've not found anything else about the tools or jewellery though.