All of ninjafetus's Comments + Replies

My current thinking on money and low carb diets

In my experience trying both, slow-carb was cheaper and more fulfilling than keto, mostly because of beans. Beans are filling, and it's easy to make a big batch of those and eat them throughout the week.  They're also dirt cheap, and if you have a pressure cooker you don't have to pre-soak before cooking. 

2adamzerner7mo
Good point. I don't enjoy beans too much, but I should probably incorporate them more.
Where do your eyes go?

Sub-example for music games:  where you look might depend on your level of skill at the game!  Beginner DDR players have to look down from time to time to re-center themselves on the dance pad, because they don't know how to feel where they're stepping.  Intermediate DDR players need to turn the scroll rate fast enough to read the patterns, but want them slow enough that they have time to read ahead and process the pattern  ("is this upcoming pattern a crossover?").  Advanced DDR players have no problem decoding patterns, and are m... (read more)

Are PS5 scalpers actually bad?

Arguably the only value they provide to society is finding the actual equilibrium price of a PS5.  Is that important enough to be "good"?

Sure, they provide value to their customers.  But every PS5 that is bought for scalping makes it harder to find a PS5 at the store. They're effectively spending other people's time to save their customers' time. Qualitatively, that sounds like a transfer of value from one group to another -- not a benefit to society overall.  

In the end, the same number of people will own a console and get to use it. &... (read more)

1skot5231y
I think you’re right that it’s an overall loss. If they’re going to be sold at above msrp, it might as well go to the manufacturer to incentivize more supply. Otherwise, that delta goes to scalpers, and the scalpers have to spend their time. I think the reason Sony doesn’t raise prices is because it is sensitive to perception of users. The console itself is really just a portal to the Sony ecosystem, which is where the money is made anyways. They don’t want to be seen as charging you for the privilege of paying them for subscriptions and $80 games, especially since their model vis-a-vis PC gaming is lower upfront cost, higher ongoing costs. I think they’re playing the long game here, content to let the scalpers take the heat, while they wait out supply shocks that everyone sees as transient anyways.
2willbradshaw1y
As I said in my reply to Dave Orr above, I now suspect that my opinion on the goodness or badness here is probably dominated by the net effect on the deadweight loss of time. (I'm not sure how much I think this should be weighted by the economic and/or social value of each person's time.) So my main questions now are (1) what is the net effect, and (2) what would the net effect be, if people were more rational about how much they value their time? (I'm also not sure how much the answer to (2) would change my view.) It sounds like you think the answer to (1) is positive? One important difference from classic pro-price-gouging arguments here, that I didn't really crystallise until now, is that the scalpers aren't really doing anything (AFAIK) to increase supply. So we lack the cutting-down-logs-with-chainsaws [https://www.econlib.org/library/Columns/y2007/Mungergouging.html] angle.
Deliberately Vague Language is Bullshit

If numbers could be used but aren't then you are dealing with a taboo subject

Alternatively, the speaker doesn't precisely know, or the specifics are a distinction without consequence.  E.g., gjm's example where someone recommends against pursuing a career in theoretical physics "unless you're very smart."

Vague language is bullshit when the vagueness is deliberate with the intention to mislead.

Maybe this could be a subset of "simple" language  (vague because complexity is unnecessary), but it's not clear if this was an intent of that category.

Open, Free, Safe: Choose Two

I can imagine a community picking one vs two.

E.g., a community of enthusiasts for some niche interest might prefer open, not free, and not safe.

Why?  If they're closed, they don't have enough members for their niche.  If they're free, the niche will get watered down to more-casual adjacent interests and discussions.  The quality of discussion will drop for the main users.  And not safe because they'll intentionally have to bully and gatekeep to maintain social norms and high expectations for level of discussion.

Debugging the student

I've taught and tutored math, and this concept is very familiar to me.  

When tutoring, I will do as much debugging and back-and-forth as I can.  Whenever possible, I would prefer to spend the time to really help cultivate understanding rather than just helping someone stumble through the homework.

When teaching, there's a lot of constraints that limit the ability to go back and forth.  Not all the students are at the same level, there's a course curriculum that needs to be covered (as much as possible), and there's simply not enough time to d... (read more)

2adamzerner1y
That definitely makes sense about it sometimes not being possible for various reasons, like larger class sizes or time constraints.
Caring less

Bingo. When people say what they care about, they're treating it as a statement of values. When they say what they prioritize, they say what they're actually doing.

Ideally, people would do things that match their values, or at least be honest about what their values are, but it's a rare person that will say "I don't care about that" to some tragedy, even when they plan to do nothing.

From what I've seen, the more way to publicly "care less" about X instead of Y without it threatening your ego is to say you'... (read more)