All of spencerg's Comments + Replies

Curated conversations with brilliant rationalists

Thanks for the cost estimates on producing transcripts, that's helpful! 

Curated conversations with brilliant rationalists

Oh whoops, that was definitely a mistake on my part, I meant to include that one, sorry for the oversight! I updated the post!

Curated conversations with brilliant rationalists

Unfortunately, we don't have transcripts for these! Sorry about that. I recommend listening at 1.5x-2.5x speed.

2BrianTan20dThere's Otter.ai [https://otter.ai/] which costs $8-30/month depending on which plan you get. You can try their free plan too to get a feel of how good their transcription is. I haven't used rev.com compared to Otter, but I think it also takes ~1x the time of the audio to fix the mistakes of Otter.ai, which would make it similar in time-cost to fixing Rev.com transcripts. So Otter.ai might be a way cheaper option than Rev.com. And the transcripts should be ready within 30-60 minutes of you upload it, given that it's AI-based, versus Rev, which I think is actual people typing your transcript.
7mingyuan22dI don't feel like listening faster solves the same problem as having a transcript... Also yeah, like the podcasters below mentioned, it's totally worth it to make transcripts. Just use Rev.com.

for reference of how costly transcripts are, the first "speech-to-audio" conversion is about $1.25 per minute, and it could take 1x the time of the audio to fix the mistakes when both have native accents, and up to 2x the audio time for non-native speakers. For a 1h podcast, this would amount to $75 + hourly rate, so roughly $100/podcast. Additionally, there's a YT-generated-subtitles free alternative. I'm currently trying this out, I'll edit this to let you know how long it takes to fix them per audio hour.

You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

Hi, I'm not sure if this works automatically with cross-posting - depends what you mean exactly. You'd have to set it up on each website you want the cards to appear on.

You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

Hi Yoav! Sorry for the troubles, we'll investigate - I just sent you a private message via LessWrong, could you take a look? Thanks! 

You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

A few thoughts on this:

• I don't think Orbit existed when we started working on Thought Saver (or if it did, we didn't know about it). When Quantum Country came out I wasn't aware (not sure if anyone was aware?) at the time that it was part of a larger project (maybe it wasn't yet at that point?)

• Thought Saver has a different focus than Orbit (e.g., Thought Saver is not focussed on embedded essays - it just seems that way because the LessWrong team asked if we could add that feature since they wanted to try embedded flashcard quizzes). Thought Saver is mo... (read more)

4andymatuschak2moThanks, Spencer—I'm excited to see what you learn from this. :) FWIW, Orbit can indeed be used self-serve [https://docs.withorbit.com], but its OEmbed support (for embedding into user-generated content editors like on here, Medium, GitHub, etc) is not yet available; you must be able to embed HTML blocks. I've not yet advertised this very broadly because I've been looking to cultivate closer relationships with authors in contexts where the medium might be especially useful. Like many commenters here, I fear the existing embedding interaction is probably a net negative in many contexts.
You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

Hi Yoav! It should be putting them all into the same deck. If you click the search bar it should show all your decks. Can you click feedback in the upper right and tell us what you see there? We've never encountered an issue like the one you're describing. We'd like to help you get to the bottom of it.

 

Thanks!

2Yoav Ravid2moWhen I click the search bar it shows the starting deck I added (How to make the most of thought saver) and 6 decks with the same name (which is the number of cards I created for it)
You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

Fair enough, though I disagree with these points. For one thing, this feature already works, so I don't expect it will take any significant amount of time from the LessWrong dev team. 

But to respond to your more specific points, from my perspective:

(1) there is a common misconception that flashcards and/or spaced repetition is mainly useful for facts and definitions. It is also very useful for concepts ("a generative adversarial network is..."), takeaways (e.g., "the most important three points this post makes are..."), connections between ideas ("X a... (read more)

6G Gordon Worley III2moThese are all quite reasonable, and I'm pretty open to the idea that I'm mistaken and anchoring too much on the fact that I didn't find flash cards for spaced repetition useful, which might ultimately bias how heavily I weight things or assess the likelihood that flashcards would be helpful.
You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

Yep, you can import from csv file format and export (your own decks) to csv file format using Thought Saver.

2Gunnar_Zarncke2moGreat. Will look into it.
You Can Now Embed Flashcard Quizzes in Your LessWrong posts!

A big shout-out to David for making this feature happen :) 

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Sorry to hear you didn’t like it. What we’re the aspects that turned you off? Do you mean the flash cards and exercises or something else?

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Interesting question - to what extent is ego depletion (insofar as it occurs) related to rising marginal cost of effort? It feels to me that is part of what's going on, but maybe not all of it. For instance, some forms of effort feel like their marginal cost only goes up gradually, and others more steeply. Motivation also seems relevant (it can go down over time) and that seems to have less to do with marginal cost from what I can tell.

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Thanks for this very thoughtful reply Kaj, I really appreciate the time you took to break down your thoughts on each strategy! :) 

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Good point! I actually had that as a footnote in the original post, but accidentally didn't port it over when I constructed the article here. Thanks for the feedback.

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Agreed that people's internal mental states can be wildly different even while their external behavior is about the same. Yet there is a temptation to assume that similar external behavior implies similar mental states.

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

That's interesting. One thing I'll note about "energy" is that I suspect it can be subdivided further. For instance, I think that mental fatigue (e.g., after doing hard math problems for an hour) differs from physical fatigue (e.g., after lifting weights hard for an hour) which differs from sleepiness (e.g., when you haven't slept for a long time), and I also suspect that mental slowness (e.g., like some people get upon waking or when drunk) is a fourth thing. It sometimes seems pep/enthusiasm are yet another thing that it's meaningful to distinguish from the others (you can feel a lack of fatigue without having pep).

3fT3g03moAgree. I think most cases in modern worklife and productivity questions boil down to the mental fatigue + mental slowness components, which in my mind would be correlated but distinct.
How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Hi Kaj, thanks for your comments, I find them really interesting! I was not intending the article to be about how to become Ty (internally). I think Ty has a bunch of traits that are difficult to replicate (note: Ty is a real person, but Ty is not their real name - they agreed with everything I said about them in the article and I used their details with permission). I do, however, think it is feasible to behave in ways that are more like Ty, through other means (e.g., by applying specific strategies). So I agree that the strategies aren't about making one... (read more)

7Raemon3moFYI, I'd have found it helpful to have formally stated "Ty is a real person, but not their real name." I found myself fairly confused about whether he was real and assumed he probably wasn't.
9Kaj_Sotala3moThanks for engaging, and glad to hear you find my comments interesting :) I forgot to say that I do really like the little "flashcards" interspersed in the essay - great device for increasing recall. (I immediately started wondering whether to implement them for some of my own upcoming articles.) If we agree on these strategies not being useful for becoming like Ty internally, then I guess there are two separate questions: * Is it useful to lump these strategies together as counteractive * Are they useful in general (regardless of whether they're counteractive or not) Addressing the second question first, I do acknowledge that I'm probably biased towards these kinds of approaches because they have tended to not be very effective for me, making me somewhat unfairly assume that they're not going to be very effective for others, either. :) But putting my personal bias aside, I do grant that these are useful for many people. My bigger issue was that even if they are effective, I do think that many of them are counteractive, and both the title ("Self Control Without 'Self-Control'") and the initial Ty story led me to expect a discussion of non-counteractive ("transformative") methods. And to be clear, even though I think that transformative methods are better if you can use them, I again don't mean to say that counteractive methods are worthless. They're just not what I was expecting. :) As for my argument that they're counteractive... by 'counteractive', I mean: * An approach that involves countering an existing response with a new response, so that the old and new responses compete. * Competition may mean that they a) are locked in an eternal struggle without either one ever becoming clearly dominant or b) the counteractive response may eventually establish itself as mostly dominant but still fail in some circumstances or c) the counteractive response may eventually suppress the original response completely, but getting t
How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Ty IS a real person! (used with permission, but Ty is not their name)

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Hi Vladimir, thanks for your comments. Could you elaborate on what you would like to see more justification for when you say ("insufficient readily available justification")? I'd also be interested to know what framing seemed "somewhat arbitrary." 

In the section "Nine Traits of Self-Controlled Behavior" my claim is that those pretty self-evidently are traits that (i) differ non-negligibly between people and (ii) can manifest as "self-controlled behavior." Are there items in that list that you think don't differ between people, or that you don't think ... (read more)

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Interesting, thanks for letting me know - could you say a bit more about what feels negatively framed about it, and what it would be like to make it positly framed?

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Hi Austin, I'm glad you found the article useful! :) 

How You Can Gain Self Control Without "Self-Control"

Good point! Somehow I didn't notice that :) 

Spencer Greenberg's TEDx talk: "Improve Your Life with Probability"

Thank you for pointing that out, it would have been better if I had spoken more carefully. I definitely don't think that uncertainty is in the territory. Please interpret "there is great uncertainty in X" as "our models of X produce very uncertain predictions."

0SimonF10yOk, I'm glad you interpreted my comment as constructive criticism. Thanks for your efforts!