All of Subbak's Comments + Replies

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

Maybe he recognized the voice, assuming it was not disguised by a charm?

2MarkusRamikin7yIt was disguised. And Harry he admits in chapter 120 only figuring it out after the fact.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

Well, as he said, it was an "obviously hidden" horcrux screaming "I'm apowerful magical artifact" (like the locket in book 6, which he explicitly calls out), as opposed to a random pebble in the middle of the desert.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

Well, I read canon a loooong time ago but IIRC in book 7 in one of the first chapter Voldie goes around humiliating Lucius, in particular taking his wand without offering a replacement, and insulting him for believing he (Voldie) would give Lucius his wand in exchange. The conversation with Mr. White (" most delinquent of my servants") and the fact that he humiliates him similarly by removing part of his magic ability is reminiscent of that.

Also, before I thought Mr. Grim was Peter Pettigrew, but now that we know that Black is the actual bad guy,... (read more)

3knb7yMr. Grim is also a reference to canon, because The Grim is an omen Harry sees which turns out to be Sirius in his black dog animagus form.
1Jost7yAlthough in canon, Lucius (and the Malfoy family) falling into Voldemort’s disgrace was caused by several events which did not happen in HPMoR, including giving away one of Voldemort’s horcruxes (the diary in book 2), failing to steal the prophecy from a handful of teenagers (book 5) and Draco’s failure to kill Dumbledore (book 6). In HPMoR, Lucius did not fail Voldemort that often.
0MarkusRamikin7yThanks, good points. But it doesn't explain how Harry would know.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

Well, the Dark Mark was not THAT stupid. Also, it's the kind of clever thing you can only pull off when impersonating someone who is not that smart.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

Well I guess eventually the right memories will come back to her. Although I guess Draco can't have been more than a few months old when she "died".

6ourimaler7yHe's about Harry's age and Narcissa was disappeared before Voldy got kaboomed, so, yeah.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 120

For what it's worth, I too thought Mr. White was Lucius before seeing everyone else convinced it was Counsel. It seemed more in line with canon, and "white" evokes Lucius's awesome white hair. On the other hand, Harry could be mistaken, and using codenames that seem to indicate who the person behind is when they in fact bear no relation sounds like a thing Voldie would do.

0MarkusRamikin7yCould you elaborate on the evidence pointing to White that you see? In what way is it more in line with canon?

using codenames that seem to indicate who the person behind is when they in fact bear no relation sounds like a thing Voldie would do.

It is a thing Tom Riddle would do. The Voldemort personality seems to have been deliberately less clever.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

Except people are cruel and many of them would rather see criminals in Azkaban than living a relatively normal life. Although to be honest, making criminals chose between Azkaban and the last part of A Clockwork Orangeis pretty awful already in my opinion.

2Jiro7yPeople precommit to punishing criminals because having a precommitment discourages crime--if the criminal can figure out that you'll change your mind once the crime is over with, and not punish them, the prospect of punishment won't work as a deterrent. But if you have to follow through on the precommitment, that may mean you just "cruelly" punished a criminal "even though at this point causing the criminal harm doesn't benefit anyone". Most people don't consciously think of it this way, but people don't usually know why their own memes spread.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

Ugh... That's such a painful read I had to stop in the middle. Seriously, how is it rational for Harry to be insulting V in English? Even if V somehow does not take offense, one of his Death Eaters will. I know I felt like Adava Kadavra-ing the stupid brat who was pretending to be HJPEV in this...

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

I don't think this line of analysis works for determining that a work is sexist. At least, it's not sexist in a problematic way (i.e. we need to get rid of it, or at least be aware of the sexism when reading it), it's sexist because the world we live in is sexist and it's practically impossible to write anythong non-sexist. Does HPMOR do anything to advance the condition of women? No, but neither does it do anything to adress racism, ableism, homophobia and plenty of other societal issues. That's not why the book was written. On the other hand, it has two ... (read more)

-6seer7y
9NancyLebovitz7yHPMOR somewhat examines the automatic lack of respect adults have for children.
1JoshuaZ7yWell, I'm not sure what it means for a work as a whole to be sexist. So in so far as that doesn't seem well-defined I agree. Hang on. Full stop. The idea that any form of sexism in a work means we need to get rid of that work is something I strongly, and fundamentally disagree with. No amount of sexism is a reason for censorship. Possibly, but there are degrees of sexism, and there are issues when reinforcing certain sexist norms. I'd point out that for example, Brandon Sanderson Mistborn series is an excellent example of a series without any sexism issues in how the author approach things. And that's far from the only example. Actually, racism is definitely addressed in the context of Muggles v. wizards, and homophobia has been addressed- see the point where one of the young wizards suspects that claims about homophobia in the Muggle community are an anti-Muggle slur. That was meant as a humorous aside but it was a clear dig at certain attitudes. I agree that Eliezer did a wonderful job of promoting Daphne and Tracey. If he hadn't the situation would look very different. But the argument isn't just that Hermione died without accomplishing anything, but rather that it was in a context where the male wizards (Harry and Voldemort) both received substantial power boosts, where Hermione was trying to be a heroine for feminist reasons, where people had already complained about feminist issues being treated poorly in HPMoR, and then having Hermione killed without accomplishing anything specifically because the villain desired it to have an impact on the primary male protagonist. It is that totally of issues that made this so bad.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

Then when someone says "I have information from 6 hours in the future", that would be information in and of itself. It means that 6 hours in the future life is still sustainable.

2Jost7yMagic doesn’t think of “information” like you do. Magic doesn’t work the way you expect it to work. If you suggest that it should, Magic will just look at you queerly, shrug its shoulders and continue to work the way wizards expect it to work. It’s "Oogely boogely!" [http://hpmor.com/chapter/22] all over again.
2Kindly7yAnd yet Dumbledore doesn't treat such a statement as information about the future when using his Time-Turner, which suggests that maybe the 6-hour limit is something you can think your way around.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

If Coscott is right about the Vow protecting "the world" and not "its people", then it very much did change Harry's >terminal values.

OK, I misspoke. It did not change what Harry feels are good terminal values. He may not in any way choose to assist (even by being passive) someone who would want to change that terminal value, but as long as he has not realized what Coscott may have realized, then letting people with terminal value "make sure human life goes on" know about this Vow will not be in conflict with his Vow. The... (read more)

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

So you mean that Voldie screwed it up AGAIN when he tried to mess with a prophecy? Man, some people are simply not meant to hear prophecies.

On the other hand, the Vow did not change Harry's terminal goals. While he may not work to undermine the Vow itself, it is possible that before coming to the horrible realization that he has to protect the world above its people, he lets enough slip to other so that they may find a way to remove the Vow (or put him back in a box). Also, the Vow has some loopholes:

That I shall not... by any act of mine... destroy the

... (read more)
5DanArmak7yIf Coscott is right about the Vow protecting "the world" and not "its people", then it very much did change Harry's terminal values. The intended meaning of the three persons making the vow have to match, or the Vow won't work. And I think that two randomly chosen Death Eaters, who have absolutely no idea that people could survive without the Earth, who don't even suspect that there's been manned spaceflight, would indeed think that "the world" is "the Earth".
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

I was under the impression that said Wizards had their Magic for the Vow extorted out of them by the Noble houses which had both vastly superior wealth and the ability to make them broke. I can't imagine someone willingly giving away their magic unless they had no real choice in the matter. It would be similar to giving away your legs.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

The thing, if no wizards are dying any more, how do you get those Unbreakable Vows in any ethical way?

3westward7yIf a wizard wants the P Stone Treatment, they have to agree to two things: To sacrifice a little magic as part of the Vow of another and to take a Vow themselves.
9Luke_A_Somers7yA very brief oath, so everyone ends up sacrificing some power, but it's not a crippling loss. Since everyone is doing it, you can define a single one-syllable word for the full content of the oath, make sure everyone knows what it means, and then begin using that.
7Gondolinian7yI got the impression that there were already healthy wizards who would perform Unbreakable Vows for enough money, and the thing about using terminally ill wizards was just Harry's idea to do it more efficiently.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

So what would he have been doing? Saving victims of accident so that they end up being fine after a small hospital stay? Miraculously curing terminally ill people? I find it unlikely that he could do anything else with long-term benefits without anyone catching on. But yeah, I like that alternate character interpretation of Flamel.

Mostly, resurrecting dead children. The population used to be lower, but kids also used to have piss-poor odds of making it to adult-hood. In terms of QALY, this would have been the best use, and if a child goes missing from a sickbed only to wander into the kitchen feeling chipper and fine, noone would even think twice.

9Astazha7yUnexplained recoveries are a real thing. Everyone just shrugs and celebrates, or maybe credits God or the ginko biloba. It's been Flamel all along.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 119

I can't remember, what was respectively in the Phoenix's Price and Phoenix's Fate rooms. I though both were passwords for the broken wands and similar things, but the narration implies otherwise. I also wonder what will be in the Phoenix's Egg room. It can't be prophecies (which could otherwise be the obvious choice), and I don't think Dumbledore had the foresight to store frozen brains of wizards who died so that Harry could resurrect them.

4Oscar_Cunningham7yNarcissa
4Velorien7y"Phoenix's Price is the password that opens the stairwell to the room with broken wands, pictures and Pensieve vials. Phoenix's Fate is the password that opens the final door into that room. Both times Dumbledore takes Harry to the room, he speaks the first password, then the second.
2Luke_A_Somers7yPhoenix's Price room held broken wands and other miscellaneous items reminding him of each of the friends he's lost in his battles.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 116

Well, people are less likely to believe in an idea if an argument used in favor of it later turns out to be entirely false. For example, if I say "green jelly beans are slightly carcinogenic" and someone says "yes, also each one you eat has a 1/100 chance of killing you immediately", makes a lot of publicity about this, and months later it turns out that that statement was completely unfounded, then people will be less likely to believe me now. Even though they have very little new information compared to just me saying "green jell... (read more)

4Velorien7yHm. While QQ was widely praised as being a great teacher, I don't think anyone missed the fact that he was radiating a constant aura of evil (before the fact that as the Defense Professor he was guaranteed to be evil by definition). I think his contribution to public perception would have been "some Slytherins are incredibly badass" rather than "some Slytherins are good".
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

Without any hesitation despite his wounds the Dark Lord jerked down and right through the air.

Something that could indicate trying to dodge, or consciousness leaving the body. It's not unreasonable for Voldie to think "I've lost here, no matter what I do this body will be unusable in the near future, in case he has a plan to incapacitate me without triggering my Horcrux wards I'd better go someplace else".

All in all I'd assign a high subjective probability to Voldie's spirit being intact. Voldemort is a thorough planner, so total Oblivation is... (read more)

0raecai7yLet's suppose for a moment that Voldemort realises in time that he's about to be got rid of in some way he'd not predicted and loses his body before Stuporfy hits him. Are there still any justifiable ways for Harry to win [i.e. incapacitate V at least as much as in 115 by all justifiable means]? He would probably have to get back in time as fast as he can, before he witnesses death and/or torture of his parents/friends (which V is going to start), so he can create a time loop where they are safe. But what to do next? Harry has an hour to protect a lot of people he cares about from a bodyless spirit. It won't do to gather them all in a safe place only to have V enter one of them and kill the others. It's going to be harder to devise a plausible mistake for V because now some of the plot devices planned from the beginning won't help us. ETA: I mean, Harry only needs to hit Voldemort with a spell strong enough to knock V out, but light enough not to knock Harry out and not to exhaust him. And V now knows that and may escape the body even if he can't evade the bolt. Unless there are extra-fast sniper magic wands, there needs to be a trick. As stated in 108, V is now free to select whom to possess from a lot of weak/willing people. I wonder if Hermione can be possessed at this point: is she sufficiently weak? (no idea) does possession mean harm? (probably yes, because the body of Quirrell aged too fast) does V's promise not to hurt Hermione still stand? (maybe yes, but if not, V now has a very young and durable body to live in)
7Jost7yWe don’t know enough details about how the Horcrux Network and the Special Connection between V and H work, but … … this is highly unusual for an obliviation, so I think it is very likely that V has not left his body.
6Vaniver7yIt is implied that while Voldemort can stop possessing a victim at will, he cannot stop inhabiting his own body at will. [EDIT]Though Harry internally states the opposite: This is the part I was thinking of:
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

Well, yes, but it had to be believable that Hermione had cast it, therefore we can assume that it would not have triggered the wards even if Quirrel had not cast it.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

Presumably shields let air through, so they probably also let nanotubes through.

2skeptical_lurker7yWell, I don't know how shields work in this setting, but one possibility is that shields do not let anything magical through, which would stop transfigured materials. Shields do stop bullets, so... is it a matter of speed? Do shields stop fast things like bullets, but let slow things such as knives through? If carbon nanotubes work, then wizards who are not familer with the latest muggle science could still stab each other with very thin (to the point of near invisibility) diamond blades.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

We know for a fact that the Hogwarts wards do not raise an alarm when they should, because they did not detect Draco being under a Blood-Cooling Charm. And we also know that Voldie had a better idea regarding those wards (whether he actually had said wards in place around Draco is debatable, but still, he had the idea).

So I think it's extremely probable that the wards he has to detect his own death are more efficient than the Hogwarts wards, and he's currently riding Bella's body and kicking himself for once more not having just used Avada Kedavra.

5Phigment7yOr he and Bella are kicking back on a beach in the Caribbean, drinking alcohol from coconuts and murdering anyone who plays loud music nearby or fails to clean up after their dogs. Rematch in twenty years.
0MathMage7yThe Blood-Cooling Charm was invented for the story specifically to offer a means of murder that didn't set off the wards until the point of death; furthermore, if a professor (Quirrell) cast it, the wards wouldn't trigger anyway.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

As Weaver, she said something like "Drugs are awesome kids, but it's what comes after that really sucks. Being a supervillain is the same".

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

So I decided not too look at comments during the hunt. I then got a "solution", but decided to wait a bit for something better to post it. And then I did not have time to post it. Well, silly me...

Anyway, because I have not seen this discussed (but maybe it was and I missed it?), here's my take on defending yourself from most ways to kill you. Note that this would not have worked for Harry for various reasons (as I said, my solution was unsatisfying), but I still think it could be debated.

Fact 1: Killing Curses cannot be blocked by magic or mater... (read more)

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, March 2015, chapter 114 + chapter 115

I guess micro-managing the nanotubes isn't so different conceptually from micro-managing bugs carrying silk ropes...

3Vaniver7yYeah, but remember that guvf eryvrq ba pbzchgngvbany cbjre pbzvat sebz gur bgure havirefr, naq nf V erpnyy vg jura fur yriryrq hc vg pbafhzrq zber naq zber bs ure oenva gb pbageby ure cbjre.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 109

Another possibility if that "unbreakable" works fine on things that have very few moving parts, but if you try that on a human body then they become utterly incapable of changing. Their muscles don't flex, which means they can't breathe and their heart stops beating, and they die very quickly.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 109

And changing the genre when the story is over 90% complete would be a questionable move.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 109

And now I feel stupid for not thinking of option 3. While it would be very amusing to have everyone fooled into forgetting that mirrors also reflect things (duh), there are convincing arguments for option 1, the main one being timing.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 108

Bella wasn't entirely arbitrary, it was to set up a joke when Harry thought Quirrel was talking about Sirius.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 108

Well, given his actions in the past he can hardly call this idiocy worthy of being killed. Also, Firenze was not annoying him by being an idiot, he was annoying him by threatening Harry, for whom he had other plans.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 108

No, I mean she had an intact hymen probably, but it's just the fact that "virgin = intact hymen" is a pretty silly notion to begin with. Especially since it outright says she'd been Baba Yaga's lover for some time already. Having sex pretty much means you're not a virgin any more. Kind of the point.

9Izeinwinter7yThe story doesn't really make sense as told. It fit's Quirrell's view of the world to a T, tough, so he isn't questioning it enough. Dons tinfoil Someone on reddit pointed out that "confused scribble" might simply mean "A busload of aurors in a bag of holding" Now for really amusing wtfry, let's make that "A busload of arch-wizards." Follow me down the rabbithole for a second: Voldemort's read on the tale of Perenelle is obviously, blatantly, just wrong. It fits his worldview far to well, and has some logical flaws in it, especially concerning the cup. So, I had a thought. As Harry pointed out, one thing to do with immortality, is to share it. Further, it is a core part of wizarding culture to not share dangerous magic freely. And the stone is dangerous. It isn't just immortality, it is also a weapon of utterly insane destructive potential. Theory 1: Baba Yaga is not dead. Perenelle was simply the first person she chose to share her secret with. I give this one quite high odds. The most likely alternative is that her death was accidental, which would be just.. ugh. Traumatic, much? Theory 2: All those historical wizards that lived very long lives? Those were her further apprentices as she - being appropriately cautious with the dooms-day device - established that they could, in fact, be trusted with this level of power over a very long period of time. (.. and probably some mind-reading) Most of them are also not dead. And most of them are sitting in that chamber, playing poker.

If you're going to be using old definitions "lovers = having sex" is a pretty recent change in meaning.

but it's just the fact that "virgin = intact hymen" is a pretty silly notion to begin with.

Um, the relevant property is that the man can be sure the woman's child will be his, and for that "virgin = intact hymen" is useful.

Maybe, but it's certainly the common definition at the time, and besides the terms of the deal pretty explicitly said "drop of blood" anyway.

8CellBioGuy7yCouple of centuries ago. Their definitions are not our definitions. Also possibly a stupid natural-language parsing artifact.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 108

I must say, the thought of Voldie kicking himself (well, wanting to, but he couldn't because no legs) while spending nine years as a disembodied spirit in the Voyager Plaque was extremely amusing.

I also loved the fact that his Voldemort persona was designed to be a stupid Dark Lord that would last weeks at most and ended up being way too strong for Magical Britain.

6DanArmak7yOne wonders how Lucius Malfoy, and Draco, will react to hearing all of this.

One of my favorite bits:

I tried weakening Voldemort's attacks, to see if it was possible for him to lose; at once the Ministry committed fewer Aurors to oppose me!

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapter 108

The Dark Lady's heart was captured, and they became lovers. And then one night (...) they lay together in the fashion of a >man and a woman. But Perenelle had been a virgin until that night.

I get what is meant, but if they had been lovers for some time then I would say that Perenelle was not a virgin in any meaningful sense of the word. Of course, from an old-fashioned point of view she might have been, but this sentence is not accompanied by a modifier expressing the change in values as the next one is.

3Epictetus7yLet us recall that this story takes place in the 90s and that Tom Riddle attended Hogwarts in the 40s. I don't think that his views on sexual politics are entirely consistent with those of the present-day, so he may view "virgin" as meaning "not penetrated by a man".
2DanArmak7yRomeo and Juliet, the Star-Crossed Lovers (so called by Shakespeare), never had sex. So the words were used as Quirrel describes, six centuries ago.
2linkhyrule57y*shrug* Maybe Perenelle didn't exercise much and still had an intact hymen. There's your drop of blood.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

Well, it's possible that all the rooms were designed by different professors with little to no cooperations so that one single breach would not compromise the security of the whole thing. If Snape wanted to put claymores in other rooms, he'd need to tell the other professors.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

Inbreeding just makes it more likely you get two of the same allele (with bad consequences if said allele is deleterious), it does not make it inherently more likely that any single allele you have is deleterious.

0[anonymous]7yTrue. And a progressively large portion of progeny would die before procreating, exactly because of that. Maybe there would even be bottlenecks along the way. Yet it seems to me that a squib (?) whom Merope chose could have a different set of heterozygous=hidden deleterious alleles, which in Merope's genome would not have been eliminated yet, but getting close to it. Also, how on Earth was Slytherin's curse even inherited? It would be something outside of genes, since he didn't know about their existence. So the ability would be develop undiminished with blood 'dilution', which means a Parselmouth cannot be seen as evidence of pure-bloodedness, which would be a blow to Draco's belief in his father's ethics... And in Harry's belief in genes-only inheritance... Now, if Salazar was secretly a woman, and only daughters would get to be Parselmouths, that would be another story...
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

It is still weird, though. Do we have any bounds on the relation between size of the object and time you can maintain the transfiguration. Harry can maintain (without contact) some transfigurations for a pretty long time, even with a large-ish object like a cauldron. Unless the time you can maintain a transfiguration decreases very fast with the size of the end object (Harry transfigured a unicorn and a big rock into something small and maintained it easily), there is no reason why Quirrel would not be able to create transfigured clones able to clone thems... (read more)

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

This is probably not the case however, as it would feel like a very cheap language trick given that Quirrel has used "you" and "I" in parseltongue in a non-ambiguous manner several times already. Even worse, if Quirrel was going by this then he'd risk Harry picking up the trick and promising to help himself get the stone, and not consider it a betrayal.

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

If this was feasible then all Dark Wizards would probably be using temporary clones of their minions to do their bidding instead of real minions.

There are three possibilities here:

1) It takes longer to clone someone than the transfigureation lasts, so by the time you have cloned their feet, their head has detransfigured. (This assumes that humans are so complex that you have to concentrate on one part of them at a time, like Harry's pencil.) In this case, cloning is useless.

2) It takes longer to clone someone than the transfigureation lasts, but the time-limit starts once the transfigureation is complete. In this case, cloning minions is still useful for increasing numbers before a battle, or for... (read more)

Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, February 2015, chapters 105-107

That's not how inbreeding works, though... If one of your parents' family (in Voldie's case, his mother) has been inbred for generations but the other parents has a completely different gene pool, then you should be fine. Inbreeding just makes it more likely that you have two of the same recessive allelle (which is bad in many situations), but Voldie only got one of each from his mother.

0[anonymous]7yThat is only if all deleterious alleles are recessive. Though of course, we don't have any numbers and can imagine anything. ETA: and a single recessive deleterious allele in the father's genome would have disproportionate consequences. Although there would be about 50% chance of getting it, humans carry lots of such stuff, so overall probability of weak (but at least viable) progeny should still be high enough.
0skeptical_lurker7yI actually do understand genetics, but I forgot that Voldie had a muggle father. Been a long time since I read canon HP.
Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, part 28, chapter 99-101

If you want to play with a (rather tame, since it doesn't always use its regeneration powers) Bucholz Hydra, here's a link for you: http://www.madore.org/~david/math/hydra.xhtml

For my part, I knew about hydra games and had forgotten the name, but the context made it fairly obvious that this was a joke about the hydra being so hard to kill that you can't prove you do it with only Peano arithmetic.

9loup-vaillant8yI have defeated the hydra! (I had to cut off 670 heads). Feels like playing Diablo.