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Recent Comments

"Caledonian, I look forward to being able to downvote your comments instead of deleting them."

What, the software forces you to delete my comments? Someone's holding a gun to your head?

I look forward to your forming a completely closed memetic sphere around yourself, instead of this partially-cl...(read more)

"you will get a semi-obsessed sub-culture of users with a few shared biases who effectively take over"

Of course! That's the point of the exercise.

The hope is that the shared biases will be ones that the site owner considers valuable and useful, and that the prospective audience for the site wan...(read more)

Specifying an entire world by listing every single thing you want to be included in it would take a very long time. Most worlds complex enough to be interesting are far too complicated to talk about in that manner.

Perhaps it would be more efficient to list the specific things you want to be <i>ex...(read more)

Because I'm curious:

How much evidence, and what kind, would be necessary before suspicions of contrarianism are rejected in favor of the conclusion that the belief was wrong?

Surely this is a relevant question for a Bayesian.

I would personally be more concerned about an AI trying to make me deliriously happy <i>no matter what methods it used</i>.

Happiness is part of our cybernetic feedback mechanism. It's designed to end once we're on a particular course of action, just as pain ends when we act to prevent damage to o...(read more)

Few people become bored with jumping in SMB because 1) becoming skilled at it is quite hard, 2) it's used to accomplish specific tasks and is quite useful in that context, 3) it's easier to become bored with the game as a whole than with that particular part of it.

Having to take action to avoid unpleasant surprises is usually pleasant, as long as your personal resources aren't stretched too much in the process.

If you eliminate the potential for unpleasant surprises, the game isn't much fun. (Imagine playing chess against an opponent that was so predictable...(read more)

Lots of people find planning their character design decisions, and exploring in detail the mechanical consequences of their designs, to be 'fun'.

Which is why there are so many sites that (for example) post in their entirety the skills for Diablo II and how each additional skillpoint affects the re...(read more)

Gwern, why do you think we have those emotional responses to pain in the first place?

Yes, I'm aware of forms of brain damage that make people not care about negative stimuli. They're extraordinarily crippling.