Diffractor

Diffractor's Comments

CO2 Stripper Postmortem Thoughts

Yup, this turned out to be a crucial consideration that makes the whole project look a lot less worthwhile. If ventilation at a bad temperature is available, it's cheaper to just get a heat exchanger and ventilate away and eat the increased heating costs during winter than to do a CO2 stripper.

There's still a remaining use case for rooms without windows that aren't amenable to just feeding an air duct outside, but that's a lot more niche than my original expectations. Gonna edit the original post now.

CO2 Stripper Postmortem Thoughts

Also, a paper on extremely high-density algal photobioreactors quotes algal concentration by volume as being as high as 6% under optimal conditions. The dry mass is about 1/8 of the wet mass of algae, so that's 0.75% concentration by weight percent. If the algal inventory in your reactor is 9 kg dry mass (you'd need to waste about 3 kg/day of dry weight or 24 kg/day of wet weight, to keep up with 2 people worth of CO2, or a third of the algae each day), that's 1200 kg of water in your reactor. Since a gallon is about 4 kg of water, that's... 300 gallons, or 6 55-gallon drums, footprint 4 ft x 6 ft x 4 ft high, at a bare minimum (probably 3x that volume in practice), so we get the same general sort of result from a different direction.

I'd be quite surprised if you could do that in under a thousand dollars.

CO2 Stripper Postmortem Thoughts

[EDIT: I see numbers as high as 4 g/L/day quoted for algae growth rates, I updated the reasoning accordingly]

The numbers don't quite add up on an algae bioreactor for personal use. The stated growth rate for chlorella algae is 0.6 g/L/day, and there are about 4 liters in a gallon, so 100 gallons of algae solution is 400 liters is 240 g of algae grown per day, and since about 2/3ds of new biomass comes from CO2 via the 6CO2+6H2O->C6H12O6 reaction, that's 160 g of CO2 locked up per day, or... about 1/6 of a person worth of CO2 in a 24 hour period. [EDIT: 1 person worth of CO2 in a 24 hour period, looks more plausible]

Plants are inefficient at locking up CO2 relative to chemical reactions!

Also you wouldn't be able to just have the algae as a giant vat, because light has to penetrate in, so the resulting reactor to lock up 1/6 [EDIT: 1] of a person worth of CO2 would be substantially larger than the footprint of 2 55-gallon drums.

CO2 Stripper Postmortem Thoughts

I have the relevant air sensor, it'd be really hard to blind it because it makes noise, and the behavioral effects thing is a good idea, thank you.

It's not currently with me.

I think the next thing to do is build the 2.0 design, because it should perform better and will also be present with me, then test the empirical CO2 reduction and behavioral effects (although, again, blinding will be difficult), and reevaluate at that point.

So You Want to Colonize The Universe Part 5: The Actual Design

Good point on phase 6. For phase 3, smaller changes in velocity further out are fine, but I still think that even with less velocity changes, you'll still have difficulty finding an engine that gets sufficient delta-V that isn't fission/fusion/antimatter based. (also in the meantime I realized that neutron damage over those sorts of timescales are going to be *really* bad.) For phase 5, I don't think a lightsail would provide enough deceleration, because you've got inverse-square losses. Maybe you could decelerate with a lightsail in the inner stellar system, but I think you'd just breeze right through since the radius of the "efficiently slow down" sphere is too small relative to how much you slow down, and in the outer stellar system, light pressure is too low to slow you down meaningfully.

87,000 Hours or: Thoughts on Home Ownership

I'd be extremely interested in the quantitative analysis you've done so far.

So You Want to Colonize The Universe Part 4: Velocity Changes and Energy

I'm talking about using a laser sail to get up to near c (0.1 g acceleration for 40 lightyears is pretty strong) in the first place, and slowing down by other means.

This trick is about using a laser sail for both acceleration and deceleration.

So You Want to Colonize The Universe Part 4: Velocity Changes and Energy

Yeah, I think the original proposal for a solar sail involved deceleration by having the central part of the sail detach and receive the reflected beam from the outer "ring" of the sail. I didn't do this because IIRC the beam only maintains coherence over 40 lightyears or so, so that trick would be for nearby missions.

Load More