jollybard

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The Towel Census: A Methodology for Identifying Orphaned Objects in Your Home

That all makes more sense now :)

In our case the towel rack was right in front of the toilet, so it didn't have to be an ambient thing haha

The Towel Census: A Methodology for Identifying Orphaned Objects in Your Home

I just want to point out that you should probably change your towel at least every week (preferably every three uses), especially if you leave it in a high humidity environment like a shared bathroom.

I can't even imagine the smell... Actually, yes I can, because I've had the same scenario happen to me at another rationalist sharehouse.

So, um, maybe every two months is a little bit too long.

A few obvious alternatives:

1. Everyone leave their towels in their room.
2. Guests leave their towels in their rooms. The common towels are put into a hamper every week, and the hamper goes to the laundry when it's full.
3. Have fewer towels. Not the best solution since that doesn't solve the problem of not having any towels while they're being washed, but it could create more incentive to change them more often.

This is definitely the sort of coordination problem that happens when you have a lot of people living together, but I also have a feeling that this should not happen at all, somehow. Like, in general, if this is like a hostel, then guests should behave as guests in a hostel, and the hostel itself should have people responsible for regular cleaning (this could be the permanent housemates). There is definitely a privacy and autonomy tradeoff at hostels.

Is Rationalist Self-Improvement Real?

I've said it elsewhere, but wringing your hands and crying "it's because of my akrasia!" is definitely not rational behavior; if anything, rationalists should be better at dealing with akrasia. What good is a plan if you can't execute it? It is like a program without a compiler.

Your brain is part of the world. Failing to navigate around akrasia is epistemic failure.

On decision-prediction fixed points

Maybe I ought to give a slightly more practical description.

Your akrasia is part of the world and failing to navigate around it is epistemic failure.

On decision-prediction fixed points

I see what you mean, but

if I know exactly what a tic tac toe or chess program would do,

if you were this logically omniscient, then supposing that the program did something else would imply that your system is inconsistent, which means everything is provable.

There needs to be boundedness somewhere, either in the number of deductions you can make, or in the certainty of your logical beliefs. This is what I mean by uncertainty being necessary for logical counterfactuals.

On decision-prediction fixed points

Right, so that's not a decision-prediction fixed point; a correct LDT algorithm would, by its very definition, choose the optimal decision, so predicting its behavior would lead to the optimal decision.

On decision-prediction fixed points

I don't think that's right. If you know exactly what you are going to do, that leaves no room for counterfactuals, not if you're an LDT agent. Physically, there is no such thing as a counterfactual, especially not a logical one; so if your beliefs match the physical world perfectly, then the world looks deterministic, including your own behavior. I don't think counterfactual reasoning makes sense without uncertainty.

On decision-prediction fixed points

Perhaps, but that's not quite how I see it. I'm saying akrasia is failure to predict yourself, that is when there's a disconnect between your predictions and your actions.

cousin_it's Shortform

Could convolution work?

EDIT: confused why I am downvoted. Don't we want to encourage giving obvious (and obviously wrong) solutions to short form posts?

The Jordan Peterson Mask

Metaphysical truth here describes self-fulfilling truths as described by Abram Demski, and whose existence are garanteed by e.g. Löb's theorem. In other words, metaphysical truth is truth, and rationalists should be aware of them.

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