Orfeas

Homo sapiens attempting to lead a meaningful life

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Is Success the Enemy of Freedom? (Full)

I relate very much to your old roommate who commented on your studying Go and attributing it to your intelligence. While I have always imagined myself living in a small wooden cottage with plenty of time to pursue my interests, I find it very difficult to evaluate a freedom/success trade-off while still in university. Even though I could make the case that I will most likely live more-than-comfortably as a data-scientist no matter how well I perform at the next examination, I still can't shake the feeling that I should be pushing myself to the limit. I feel as if the "fog-of-war" for determining future freedom is too thick, but I realize that I haven't actually tried to make a plan.

So here's the first outline of a "wooden cottage" plan:

  1. Graduate with a masters degree to ensure employability
  2. Acquire units of purchasing power in local currency
  3. Pay off debts, build a heap of gold coins under a mountain
  4. Scare off dwarves and a hobbit
  5. ??? 

I'll figure the rest out later, but thank you for planting the seed in my mind.

Scope Insensitivity

I find the remark about the exponential increase in scope inducing a linear increase in willingness-to-pay perhaps being due to the number of zeroes quite amusing, and it leads me to speculate how a different base numbering system would change the willingness-to-pay. 

I predict that given identical proficiency in any base b numbering system, a base-2 numbering system would decrease willingness-to-pay for an identical exponential increase in scope, and a base-16 numbering system would increase it, as a result of the shorter length representations!

I immediately and conclusively conclude that if we were to do away with our silly digits and embrace hexadecimality then the average human would be willing to part with x1.6 more units of purchasing power.