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EMdrive paper published, nearly identical to leaked draft.

It remains extremely likely that the em drive will turn out to either not work or work only by known-but-improperly-accounted-for physics (see also: Pioneer anomaly).

MIRI's 2016 Fundraiser

Ah yes, pausing ghostery seems to fix it.

MIRI's 2016 Fundraiser

Clicking the "Donate now" button under "PayPal or Credit Card" does not seem to do anything other than refresh the page.

(browser Firefox 48.0 , OS Ubuntu)

[Link] Op-Ed on Brussels Attacks

We know that whatever they did led to Paris and Brussels

Correlation / Causation?

Lesswrong 2016 Survey

I have taken the survey.

As I understand it, "This painting is beautiful" is completely equivalent to "I like (the visual aspects of) this painting".

Definitional arguments are not useful. Even using your interpretation, the point stands: the statement, properly understood, is empirical truth.

Why bring the brain into it?

No particular reason.

"This painting is beautiful" is a statement about the reaction of the speaker

That is what I mean, yes.

Or, paralleling Good_Burning_Plastic, a statement about the reaction of people generally

Whether we define beauty to be the reaction of the speaker, or the reaction of the majority of a certain group of people that are similar to the speaker, is not relevant: in both cases "This painting is beautiful" becomes an empirical truth instead of an "affective" truth.

No. "This painting is round" is a statement about the properties of the painting itself, independent of any observer. "This painting is beautiful" is a statement about the reaction of the speaker's brain upon seeing the painting. The syntactical similarity between those different kinds of statements in English (and all other natural languages that I know of) is unfortunate to say the least.

I do not think we should dilute the meaning of the word "truth" like this.

If I say "This painting is beautiful", I mean "my brain produces a pleasant reaction upon seeing this painting". The latter sentence is empirical truth. See also 2-Place and 1-Place Words

"This place feel right to me" -- true! Affectively true.

Also empirically true!

Shakespeare is truth

If by this, you mean "I like Shakespeare's writing" (an empirical truth), just say so.

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