Keep your beliefs cruxy and your frameworks explicit

Doublecrux is a valuable tool – it can help groups come to decisions, and it can enable individual thinkers to help each other form more accurate conclusions.

Unfortunately it's often a time consuming tool. Some disagreements can take hours to resolve. Others take years. By default, most of our belief networks are a messy, impenetrable morass, and disentangling that takes time.

But the core skill of doublecrux – noticing what would actually change your mind – is something you can develop. And as you develop it, I've found it easier to a) figure out what I actually believe and why, b) develop belief structures that are easier for me to understand, update, and share.

This sequence explores when doublecrux is useful, what are some important subskills, and why they're worth cultivating.