Wiki Contributions

Comments

Lily: If I was a parent I would change the fifteen minutes to ten minutes. Screen time is kind of bad for kids. I also like having an hour and a half for movies, but I think maybe it's a bit much?

haha that’s so sweet! :D

Tldr: Love used to be in short supply (for self and others). Read Replacing guilt and tried improv + metta meditation. Now it is in big supply and has lead to significant positive changes in my actions.

I have always been in a single-player and critical mindset, optimizing everything for me. Thinking about what would be a nice thing to do for others (and empathizing with their feelings) hardly ever popped into my awareness. 

Over the last year, 

  • Replacing guilt made me realize I didn't need negative thoughts to motivate me. This led me to incrementally decrease my self-criticism and learn to treat myself as I would a close friend.
  • Improv acting made me realize on a gut level that everyone has their own subjective experience that feels as true to them as mine feels to myself. This led me to get out of my head and be with the person.
  • Metta meditation made me realize I can learn to love others and myself far more than I do. A consequence is that deeply loving someone makes it really unlikely to have a bad social experience with them. Problems such as awkwardness, feeling judged, bad conversations, etc just die off and you actively start having very enjoyable social experiences. I'm surprised no self-help book talks about this.

 

Obviously, the process involved a lot more ups and downs than suggested here. But these are the three big factors I feel comfortable abstracting to that capture the fundamental changes.

I'm incredibly thankful to lesswrong and the wider rationality movement for the mentals tools it provides. My 2020 self would not have predicted this :)

I assume EA student groups have a decent amount of rationalists in them (30%?), so the two categories are not as easily separable. And thus it's not as bad as it sounds for rationalists.

Will you be approachable for incubating less experienced people (for example student interns), or do you not want to take that overhead right now?

What is the reasoning behind non-disclosure by default? It seems opposite to what EleutherAI does.

This is lovely! I’ve a couple questions (will post them in the AMA as well if this is not a good place to ask)

  1. What is the reasoning behind non-disclosure by default? It seems opposite to what EleutherAI does.

  2. Will you be approachable for incubating less experienced people (for example student interns), or do you not want to take that overhead right now?

Metta (loving-kindness) meditation would be an example practice that tries to focus attention on actively loving others in order to get better at it over time. 

I don't have time to currently point out to concrete research backing it up, but it's been often discussed positively on Lesswrong and the EA Forum and I have had surprisingly good results from it. In my experience though, it has quite a quick feedback loop so trying it out might be the most efficient way of testing it. The Waking up app by Sam Harris is a good starting point.

This is a great idea! I'm gonna try it out. It fixes quite a lot of things with existing systems, as you point out.

I'm curious though, since when have you been experimenting with it and how has it been? I'm assuming it went well, but I am interested to know more about the details in your process (setbacks, changes, etc) and expect it'll be helpful for others experimenting with this as well :)

I've often thought about this, and this is the conclusion I've reached.

There would need to be some criteria that separates morality from immorality. Given that, consciousness (ie self-modelling) seems like the best criteria given our current knowledge. Obviously, there are gaps (like the comatose patient you mention), but we currently do not have a better metric to latch on to.

Load More