Charbel-Raphaël

Charbel-Raphael Segerie

https://crsegerie.github.io/ 

Living in Paris

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I have tried Camille's in-person workshop in the past and was very happy with it. I highly recommend it. It helped me discover many unknown unknowns.

Answer by Charbel-RaphaëlApr 15, 202430

Deleted paragraph from the post, that might answer the question:

Surprisingly, the same study found that even if there were an escalation of warning shots that ended up killing 100k people or >$10 billion in damage (definition), skeptics would only update their estimate from 0.10% to 0.25% [1]: There is a lot of inertia, we are not even sure this kind of “strong” warning shot would happen, and I suspect this kind of big warning shot could happen beyond the point of no return because this type of warning shot requires autonomous replication and adaptation abilities in the wild.

  1. ^

    It may be because they expect a strong public reaction. But even if there was a 10-year global pause, what would happen after the pause? This explanation does not convince me. Did the government prepare for the next covid? 

in your case, you felt the problem, until you decided that an AI civilization might spontaneously develop a spurious concept of phenomenal consciousness. 


This is the best summary of the post currently

Thanks for jumping in! And I'm not that emotionally struggling with this, this was more of a nice puzzle, so don't worry about it :)

I agree my reasoning is not clean in the last chapter.

To me, the epiphany was that AI would rediscover everything like it rediscovered chess alone.  As I've said in the box, this is a strong blow to non-materialistic positions, and I've not emphasized this enough in the post.

I expect AI to be able to create "civilizations" (sort of) of its own in the future, with AI philosophers, etc.

Here is a snippet of my answer to Kaj, let me know what you think about it:

I'm quite confident that the meta-problem and the easy problems of consciousness will eventually be fully solved through advancements in AI and neuroscience. I've written extensively about AI and path to autonomous AGI here, and I would ask people: "Yo, what do you think AI is not able to do? Creativity? Ok do you know....".  At the end of the day, I would aim to convince them that anything humans are able to do, we can reconstruct everything with AIs. I'd put my confidence level for this at around 95%. Once we reach that point, I agree I think it will become increasingly difficult to argue that the hard problem of consciousness is still unresolved, even if part of my intuition remains somewhat perplexed. Maintaining a belief in epiphenomenalism while all the "easy" problems have been solved is a tough position to defend - I'm about 90% confident of this.

Thank you for clarifying your perspective. I understand you're saying that you expect the experiment to resolve to "yes" 70% of the time, making you 70% eliminativist and 30% uncertain. You can't fully update your beliefs based on the hypothetical outcome of the experiment because there are still unknowns.

For myself, I'm quite confident that the meta-problem and the easy problems of consciousness will eventually be fully solved through advancements in AI and neuroscience. I've written extensively about AI and path to autonomous AGI here, and I would ask people: "Yo, what do you think AI is not able to do? Creativity? Ok do you know....".  At the end of the day, I would aim to convince them that anything humans are able to do, we can reconstruct everything with AIs. I'd put my confidence level for this at around 95%. Once we reach that point, I agree I think it will become increasingly difficult to argue that the hard problem of consciousness is still unresolved, even if part of my intuition remains somewhat perplexed. Maintaining a belief in epiphenomenalism while all the "easy" problems have been solved is a tough position to defend - I'm about 90% confident of this.

So while I'm not a 100% committed eliminativist, I'm at around 90% (when I was at 40% in chapter 6 in the story). Yes, even after considering the ghost argument, there's still a small part of my thinking that leans towards Chalmers' view. However, the more progress we make in solving the easy and meta-problems through AI and neuroscience, the more untenable it seems to insist that the hard problem remains unaddressed.

a non-eliminativist might be perfectly willing to grant that yes, we can build the entire pyramid, while also holding that merely building the pyramid won't tell us anything about the hard problem nor the meta-problem.

I actually think a non-eliminativist would concede that building the whole pyramid does solve the meta-problem. That's the crucial aspect. If we can construct the entire pyramid, with the final piece being the ability to independently rediscover the hard problem in an experimental setup like the one I described in the post, then I believe even committed non-materialists would be at a loss and would need to substantially update their views.

hmm, I don't understand something, but we are closer to the crux :)

 

You say:

  1. To the question, "Would you update if this experiment is conducted and is successful?" you answer, "Well, it's already my default assumption that something like this would happen". 
  2. To the question, "Is it possible at all?" You answer 70%. 

So, you answer 99-ish% to the first question and 70% to the second question, this seems incoherent.

It seems to me that you don't bite the bullet for the first question if you expect this to happen. Saying, "Looks like I was right," seems to me like you are dodging the question.

That sounds like it would violate conservation of expected evidence:

Hum, it seems there is something I don't understand; I don't think this violates the law.

 

I don't see how it does? It just suggests that a possible approach by which the meta-problem could be solved in the future.

I agree I only gave the skim of the proof, it seems to me that if you can build the pyramid, brick by brick, then this solved the meta-problem.

for example, when I give the example of meta-cognition-brick, I say that there is a paper that already implements this in an LLM (and I don't find this mysterious because I know how I would approximately implement a database that would behave like this).

And it seems all the other bricks are "easily" implementable.

Let's put aside ethics for a minute.

"But it wouldn't be necessary the same as in a human brain."

Yes, this wouldn't be the same as the human brain; it would be like the Swiss cheese pyramid that I described in the post.

Your story ended on stating the meta problem, so until it's actually solved, you can't explain everything.

Take a look at my answer to Kaj Sotala and tell me what you think.

Thank you for the kind words!

Saying that we'll figure out an answer in the future when we have better data isn't actually giving an answer now.

Okay, fair enough, but I predict this would happen: in the same way that AlphaGo rediscovered all of chess theory, it seems to me that if you just let the AIs grow, you can create a civilization of AIs. Those AIs would have to create some form of language or communication, and some AI philosopher would get involved and then talk about the hard problem.

I'm curious how you answer those two questions:

  1. Let's say we implement this simulation in 10 years and everything works the way I'm telling you now. Would you update?
  2. What is the probability that this simulation is possible at all? 

If you expect to update in the future, just update now.  

To me, this thought experiment solves the meta-problem and so dissolves the hard problem.

But I have no way to know or predict if it is like something to be a fish or GPT-4

But I can predict what you say; I can predict if you are confused by the hard problem just by looking at your neural activation; I can predict word by word the following sentence that you are uttering: "The hard problem is really hard."

I would be curious to know what you think about the box solving the meta-problem just before the addendum. Do you think it is unlikely that AI would rediscover the hard problem in this setting?

I would be curious to know what you think about the box solving the meta-problem just before the addendum.

Do you think it is unlikely that AI would rediscover the hard problem in this setting?

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