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Recognizing memetic infections and forging resistance memes

6y
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36

Evaluating weather forecast accuracy: an interview with Eric Floehr

7y
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2

Failure Modes sometimes correspond to Game Mechanics

7y
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16

The null model of science

7y
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17

What are Arguments, from an Agorics point of view?

7y
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16

Move meetups to the sidebar?

7y
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12

Kevin T. Kelly's Ockham Efficiency Theorem

8y
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82

30th Soar workshop

8y
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18

Stigmergy and Pickering's Mangle

8y
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9

The Argument from Witness Testimony

9y
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10

Recent Comments

If humans are bad at mental arithmetic, but good at, say, not dying - doesn't that suggest that, as a practical matter, humans should try to rephrase mathematical questions into questions about danger?

E.g. Imagine stepping into a field crisscrossed by dangerous laser beams in a prime-numbers manne...(read more)

Steve Keen's Debunking Economics blames debt, not automation.

Essentially, many people currently feel that they are deep in debt, and work to get out of debt. Keen has a ODE model of the macroeconomy that shows various behaviors, including debt-driven crashes.

Felix Martin's Money goes further and...(read more)

The statements, though contradictory, refer to two different thought experiments.

The two comments, though contradictory, refer to two different thought experiments.

Is it reasonable to take this as evidence that we shouldn't use expected utility computations, or not only expected utility computations, to guide our decisions?

If I understand the context, the reason we believed an entity, either a human or an AI, ought to use expected utility as a practical deci...(read more)

Magic Haskeller and [Augustsson's Djinn](http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/1178) are provers (or to say it another way, comprehensible as provers, or to say it another way, isomorphic to provers). They attempt to prove the proposition, and if they succeed they output the term corresponding (via th...(read more)

The type constructors that you're thinking of are Arrow and Int. Forall is another type constructor, for constructing generic polymorphic types. Some types such as "Forall A, Forall B, A -> B" are uninhabited. You cannot produce an output of type B in a generic way, even if you are given access to a...(read more)

I think you may be sincerely confused. Would you please reword your question?

If your question is whether someone (either me or the OP) has committed a multiplication error - yes, it's entirely possible, but multiplication is not the point - the point is anthropic reasoning and whether "I am a Bolz...(read more)

The arithmetical hierarchy is presuming a background of predicate logic; I was not presuming that. Yes, the type theory that I was gesturing towards would have some similarity to the arithmetical hierarchy.

I was trying to suggest that the answer to "what is a prediction" might look like a type th...(read more)

Perhaps there is a type theory for predictions, with concrete predictions like "The bus will come at 3 o'clock", and functions that output concrete predictions like "Every monday, wednesday and friday, the bus will come at 3 o'clock" (consider the statement as a function taking a time and returning ...(read more)