Offenders' deadly thoughts may hold answer to reducing crime

by morganism1 min read13th Jan 20175 comments

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Ok, so we should identify criminals with "thoughts of committing deadly violence, regardless of action", and then "many of these offenders should probably never be released from confinement". A literal thought crime.

I agree, there does not seem to be a viable rehab avenue for the true psycho's. It seems either isolation or death.

It also is radically counter-productive to deny regular penitents computer and classroom education -as punishment.

I guess folks don't realize that with the heavy police prescence in some of these communities, that the chance of being picked up and held for 48 or more hours, or even getting charged for minor infractions to send "messages", actually creates even worse problems. Missing work for 2-3 days will cost you your job, then your apartment, rendering you homeless, where you can't store larger than single servings of food, the most expensive. Having a record before you can even train for a specialty, means you have no way to start working up to management or get loans for a start up.

You are stuck, forever. So, more crime....

Serious crime, from B/E and up, could spend that incarcerment time actually learning skills, like repairing self driving cars, locksmithing, and law....

I agree, there does not seem to be a viable rehab avenue for the true psycho's. It seems either isolation or death.

It also is radically counter-productive to deny regular penitents computer and classroom education -as punishment.

I guess folks don't realize that with the heavy police prescence in some of these communities, that the chance of being picked up and held for 48 or more hours, or even getting charged for minor infractions to send "messages", actually creates even worse problems. Missing work for 2-3 days will cost you your job, then your apartment, rendering you homeless, where you can't store larger than single servings of food, the most expensive. Having a record before you can even train for a specialty, means you have no way to start working up to management or get loans for a start up.

You are stuck, forever. So, more crime....

Serious crime, from B/E and up, could spend that incarcerment time actually learning skills, like repairing self driving cars, locksmithing, and law....

"This is one of the first criminological studies to look specifically at the relationship between homicidal ideation and criminal behavior."

Policy implications and treatment

It's been shown that 5 to 10 percent of offenders commit half of all crimes, DeLisi said. They also account for 60 to 100 percent of the most severe offenses, including crimes of violence and violence against law enforcement and corrections officers. Identifying these chronic offenders can have a significant impact on protecting the public from further crimes because probation officers can assign additional treatment and monitoring to these cases.

"DeLisi says most of these offenders are psychopaths who are unlikely to be rehabilitated without sustained, intensive treatment. However, treatment is often unsuccessful because of the time and resources required. "It's important to understand these offenders because they commit so many more severe crimes, which allows you to do more from a policy perspective," DeLisi said. "Many of these offenders should probably never be released from confinement, and we may need to rethink sentencing guidelines for these individuals."

DeLisi believes these offenders may require a "containment" approach used to supervise sex offenders in the community, with the premise that protection of society, not rehabilitation of the offender, is the prominent goal."

http://www.news.iastate.edu/news/2017/01/12/homicideideation

Good quote. We actually know next to nothing about how to rehabilitate offenders with high psychopathy scores. Conventional talk therapy, which is still used for most offenders, seems to be counterproductive for them, while a "tough on crime" approach focused on deterrence, strict monitoring and isolation from the surrounding community actually works unusually well. Other incentive-focused approaches - essentially, providing enrichment (education, training etc.) to at-risk subgroups, in order to heavily incent them into lawful activities and deter criminal behavior - also have good potential, but are very expensive.