Correspondence Bias

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Correspondence bias (also known as the fundamental attribution error) is the tendency to overestimate the the contribution of lasting traits and dispositions in determining people's behavior, as compared to situational effects. KickingWe might see someone kicking a vending machine might be perceived by standerby as the action ofmachine, and conclude they're an inherently angry person. Yet when we kick a vending machine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade onBut maybe they just failed a test, the revocation of ourhad their driving license revoked, and had the machine eating oureat their money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

Correspondence bias (also known as fundamental attribution error) is the tendency to overestimate the the contribution of lasting traits and dispositions in determining people's behavior, as compared to situational effects. Kicking a malfunctioning vending machine might be perceived by standerby as the action of an inherently angry person. Yet when we kick a vending machine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade on a test, the revocation of our driving license and the machine eating our money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

Correspondence bias (also known as fundamental attribution error) is the tendency to overestimate the the contribution of lasting traits and dispositions in determining people's behavior, as compared to situational effects. Kicking a malfunctioingmalfunctioning vending machine might be perceived by standerby as the action of an inherently angry person. Yet when we kick a vending machine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade on a test, the revocation of our driving license and the machine eating our money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

Correspondence bias, also (also known as the fundamental attribution error) is the tendency to overestimate the the effectscontribution of lasting traits and dispositions in determining people's behavior, as compared to situational effects. Kicking a malfunctioing vending machine might be perceived by standerby as the action of an inherently angry person. Yet when we kick a vending machine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade on a test, the revocation of our driving license and the machine eating our money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

See also

An exampleCorrespondence bias, also known as the fundamental attribution error is the tendency to overestimate the the effects of the correspondence bias may be foundlasting traits and dispositions in seeing someone kickdetermining people's behavior, as compared to situational effects. Kicking a malfunctioing vending machine - we assume they mustmight be perceived by standerby as the action of an innatelyinherently angry person. Yet when we kick a vending machine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade on a test, the revocation of our driving license and the machine eating our money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

An example of the correspondence bias may be found in viewingseeing someone kickingkick a vending machine - we think that obviouslyassume they must be an innately angry people.person. Yet when we kick a vending machinemachine, it is the obviously justified result of our failing grade on a test, the revocation of our driving license and the machine eating our money for the third time this week. We think of the other person as an evil mutant and ourselves as righteous actors.

ReferencesBlog posts

Overcoming Bias Articles
Other Resources

External references

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