The dumbest kid in the world (joke)

by CronoDAS1 min read6th Jun 202110 comments

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"The dumbest kid in the world"

A young boy enters a barber shop and the barber whispers to his customer, “This is the dumbest kid in the world. Watch while I prove it to you.”

The barber puts a dollar bill in one hand and two quarters in the other, then calls the boy over and asks, “Which do you want, son?”

The boy takes the quarters and leaves.

“What did I tell you?” said the barber. “That kid never learns!” Later, when the customer leaves, he sees the same young boy coming out of the ice cream store.

“Hey, son! May I ask you a question? Why did you take the quarters instead of the dollar bill?”

The boy licked his cone and replied, “Because the day I take the dollar, the game is over!”

9 comments, sorted by Highlighting new comments since Today at 5:53 PM
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Not smart enough to pretend to be dumb when asked for his reasons, is he.

How else are we supposed to get a punchline?

If you just cut everything from "Later" in the third-to-last paragraph onward, smart readers would probably still get it but it would be less obvious.

I always find myself confused about the intentions of the joke or the joke teller when they end it in the way you propose.  I'd get it, but then be wondering "did the joke teller get it?" or "was there some other punch line that the joke teller intended me to figure out but I didn't?".

It's similar to most of the tests I took in school.  I'd spend most of the time figuring out what the teacher intended the answer to be rather than actually learning anything new.

The guy is leaving town and will not come back. He's paying the kid ten bucks to know.

You only have two votes right now, but they counted for -10, so probably 2 strong downvotes. You can see the number of votes by hovering your mouse over the number.

That doesn't work on mobile.

It's a bit janky, but I've gotten it to work by selecting the text between the two vote symbols. Definitely not as accessible as I would like though.

Why does this joke remind me of Newcomb's Problem?