TL;DR

Tacit knowledge is extremely valuable. Unfortunately, developing tacit knowledge is usually bottlenecked by apprentice-master relationships. Tacit Knowledge Videos could widen this bottleneck. This post is a Schelling point for aggregating these videos—aiming to be The Best Textbooks on Every Subject for Tacit Knowledge Videos. Scroll down to the list if that's what you're here for. Post videos that highlight tacit knowledge in the comments and I’ll add them to the post. Experts in the videos include Stephen Wolfram, Holden Karnofsky, Andy Matuschak, Jonathan Blow, Tyler Cowen, George Hotz, and others. 

What are Tacit Knowledge Videos?

Samo Burja claims YouTube has opened the gates for a revolution in tacit knowledge transfer. Burja defines tacit knowledge as follows:

Tacit knowledge is knowledge that can’t properly be transmitted via verbal or written instruction, like the ability to create great art or assess a startup. This tacit knowledge is a form of intellectual dark matter, pervading society in a million ways, some of them trivial, some of them vital. Examples include woodworking, metalworking, housekeeping, cooking, dancing, amateur public speaking, assembly line oversight, rapid problem-solving, and heart surgery.

In my observation, domains like housekeeping and cooking have already seen many benefits from this revolution. Could tacit knowledge in domains like researchprogrammingmathematics, and business be next? I’m not sure, but maybe this post will help push the needle forward.

For the purpose of this post, a Tacit Knowledge Video is any video that communicates “knowledge that can’t properly be transmitted via verbal or written instruction”. Here are some examples:

  • Neel Nanda, who leads the Google DeepMind mechanistic interpretability team, has a playlist of “Research Walkthroughs”. AI Safety research is discussed a lot around here. Watching research videos could help instantiate what AI research really looks and feels like.
  • GiveWell has public audio recordings of its Board Meetings from 2007–2020. Participants include Elie Hassenfeld, Holden Karnofsky, Timothy Ogden, Rob Reich, Tom Rutledge, Brigid Slipka, Cari Tuna, Julia Wise, and others. Influential business meetings are not usually made public. I feel I have learned some about business communication and business operations, among other things, by listening to these recordings.
  • Andy Matuschak recorded himself studying Quantum Mechanics with Dwarkesh Patel and doing research. Andy Matushak “helped build iOS at Apple and led R&D at Khan Academy”. I found it interesting to have a peek into Matushak’s spaced repetition practice and various studying heuristics and habits, as well as his process of digesting and taking notes on papers.

For information on how to best use these videos, Cedric Chin and Jacob Steinhardt have some potentially relevant practical advice. Andy Matushak also has some working notes about this idea generally. @Jared Peterson, who "researches and trains tacit knowledge" recommends the book Working Minds "which teaches how to do Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) which is a major interviewing technique for uncovering tacit knowledge."

How to Submit

Share links to Tacit Knowledge Videos below! Share them frivolously! These videos are uncommon—the bottleneck to the YouTube knowledge transfer revolution is quantity, not quality. I will add the shared videos to the post. Here are the loose rules:

  1. Recall a video that you’ve seen that communicates tacit knowledge—“knowledge that can’t properly be transmitted via verbal or written instruction”. A rule of thumb for sharing: could a reader find this video through one or two undirected YouTube searches? If not, share it.
  2. Post the title and the URL of the video.
  3. Provide information indicating why the expert in the video is credible. (However, don’t let this last rule stop you from sharing a video! Again—quantity, not quality.)[1]

To make the comments easy to navigate, please format your comment as follows:[2]

Domain: Programming, Game Design

Link: Programming livestream VODs

Person: Jonathan Blow

Background: Creator of Braid and The Witness.

Why: Blow livestreams himself coding games and creating a programming language. I imagine people who do similar things would find his livestreams interesting.

List of Tacit Knowledge Videos

(last updated 04-16-2024)

To receive ~monthly updates with lists of new videos, add your email to this email list

Software Engineering

Machine Learning

  • Andrej Karpathy, Neural Networks: Zero to Hero.
    • 10+ years: Stanford PhD, research scientist at OpenAI & Tesla. (Website)
  • Jeremy Howard, fast.ai live coding & tutorials.
    • "He is the co-founder of fast.ai, where he teaches introductory courses, develops software, and conducts research in the area of deep learning. Previously he founded and led Fastmail, Optimal Decisions Group, and Enlitic. He was President and Chief Scientist of Kaggle" (Wikipedia).

Competitive Programming

Game Design

Other 

Research, Studying, & Problem Solving

Research

Studying

Problem Solving

  • Tim Gowers, thinking about math problems in real-time (via @jsd, @depressurize)
    • @depressurize specifically liked this series
    • "He is Professeur titulaire of the Combinatorics chair at the Collège de France, and director of research at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. In 1998, he received the Fields Medal for research connecting the fields of functional analysis and combinatorics" (Wikipedia).
  • Evan Chen, solving Math Olympiad problems. (via @jsd)
    • "Evan is a math PhD student at MIT, and a math olympiad coach. In addition to helping train the United States team, Evan runs his own training program [...] Evan was an IMO gold medalist and a winner of the 2014 USA math olympiad, [...] He also wrote the popular textbook Euclidean Geometry in Math Olympiads while in high school, which was published in 2016" (Website).
  • Tom Crawford taking Oxford Admissions Interview.
    • Math communicator. Oxford math tutor for 6 years; Cambridge math PhD; Oxford math undergrad. (LinkedIn)
  • Blackpenredpen, solving 100 integrals.
  • Struggling Grad Student, doing math.
    • Current math PhD.

Business & Business Communication

  • Elie Hassenfeld, Holden Karnofsky, Timothy Ogden, Rob Reich, Tom Rutledge, Brigid Slipka, Cari Tuna, Julia Wise: GiveWell's Public Board Meetings (2007–2020 have audio).
    • Holden Karnofsky. “Director of AI Strategy (formerly CEO) of Open Philanthropy and Co-Founder of GiveWell” (Website).
    • Elie Hassenfeld. Co-Founder and CEO of GiveWell (LinkedIn).
    • Timothy Ogden. Chief Knowledge Officer at Geneva Global, Inc.; founding editor of Gartner Press; founder of Sona Partners; chairman of GiveWell (Aspen Institute).
    • Rob Reich. Political Science professor at Stanford for 26 years (Stanford).
    • Tom Rutledge. Has worked in finance since 1989 (LinkedIn). 
    • Brigid Sliplka. Director of Philanthropy at ACLU (LinkedIn).
    • Cari Tuna. President at Open Philanthropy and Good Ventures (Wikipedia).
    • Julia Wise. Community Liaison at Centre for Effective Altruism (LinkedIn).
  • Stephen Wolfram, “Live CEOing”.
    •  “Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. […] founder and CEO of the software company Wolfram Research where he works as chief designer of Mathematica and the Wolfram Alpha answer engine.” (Wikipedia).
  • Sam Altman, Paul Graham, others; live Y Combinator office hours.
    • Sam Altman. CEO of OpenAI; former President of Y Combinator (Wikipedia).
    • Paul Graham. Co-founder of Y Combinator (Wikipedia).
    • Other YC employees.
  • Ray Dalio, “case study” recordings of business meetings and interviews with employees at Bridgewater on App Store app Principles In Action; I do not know of a way to access these through a web browser.
    • Founder of Bridgewater Associates.
  • Tegus, a library of expert interviews for finance professionals. Unfortunately, its price seems to start at $20-25,000 per user and year.

Cooking

Engineering

Farming, Construction, & Craftsmanship

Finance

  • Roaring Kitty (DeepFuckingValue), trading livestreams.
    • Held a $53,000 investment that turned into a $50 million in Gamestop. Seems he got into some regulatory trouble. I'm not sure about the specifics of this (Wikipedia).
  • Martin Shkreli, Finance Lessons.
    • “American financial criminal and businessman. Shkreli is the co-founder of the hedge funds Elea Capital, MSMB Capital Management, and MSMB Healthcare, the co-founder and former CEO of pharmaceutical firms Retrophin and Turing Pharmaceuticals, and the former CEO of start-up software company Gödel Systems, which he founded in August 2016. [...] In 2017, Shkreli was charged and convicted in federal court on two counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy for activity unrelated to the Daraprim controversy. He was sentenced to seven years in prison and up to $7.4 million in fines.” (Wikipedia).

Housekeeping & Parenting

Media & Arts

  • Taran Van Hemert, 4 hours of editing a Linus Tech Tips YouTube video.
    • "Editor, Camera Operator, Writer, Host at Linus Tech Tips" for ~10 years (Website).
  • Jacob Collier, music composition, arrangement, production. (via @bertrand russet)
    • "6-time (at 29 yo) Grammy-winning multi-instrumentalist."
  • MDS, live UI design.
    • Here’s his Dribble.
  • Andy Matuschak, (paywalled) live design stream on his Patreon.
    • Crowdfunded researcher. “[H]elped build iOS at Apple and led R&D at Khan Academy” (Website).
  • David Winters (Cranky Cameraman), [l]ife and business as a working independent Director of Photography & Broadcast Photojournalist.
    • "Over 20 years of making media"; "David has created content for many Fortune 500 brands as well as creative agencies and television networks" (Winters Media Group, Inc.).
  • Corridor Crew, "VFX Artists React". (via @talelore)
    • "They have lots of high-profile guests from Seth Rogen to Adam Savage." Host backgrounds were not readily available (if someone finds their backgrounds, feel free to comment and I will edit into the post).
  • Sofia Bue, SFX Sculpting. (via @Freyja)
    • "Sofia Bue is a professional SFX sculptor; she works at Weta Workshop which is the most well-known special FX company in the world; they were responsible for SFX on Lord of the Rings. She also won the SFX category at the world Bodypainting championships at least once so I think she’s pretty indisputably world-class at it."
  • Philip Quast, masterclass in singing Les Mis (full interview) (via @Yoav Ravid)
    • "He has won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor in a Musical three times, making him the first actor to have three wins in that category. He is perhaps best known for his role as Inspector Javert in the stage musical Les Misérables and in the Les Misérables: The Dream Cast in Concert" (Wikipedia).
  • Hayao Miyazaki, documentary detailing his creative process. (via roshan_mishra/X)
    • "A co-founder of Studio Ghibli, he has attained international acclaim as a masterful storyteller and creator of Japanese animated feature films, and is widely regarded as one of the most accomplished filmmakers in the history of animation" (Wikipedia).
  • Seymour Bernstein, teaching piano. (via @lfrymire)
    • "Pianist and composer, performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Adjunct Associate Professor of Music and Music Education at New York University."
    • "Tonebase (a paid music learning service) recorded a number of free to watch conversations with Bernstein while he plays through or teaches a piece. Bernstein is about 90 years old at the time of recording and shares an incredible amount of tacit knowledge, especially about body mechanics when playing piano."

Productivity

Sports & Games

Therapy

Writing

Miscellaneous

  • David J. Peterson, "The Art of Language Invention" (30-episode series on language construction: 'conlang') (via @Jonathan Sheehy)
    • He's been creating languages for fun since 2000 and creating languages professionally since 2009. He's done work for shows like HBO's Game of Thrones, Syfy's Defiance, Syfy's Dominion, The CW's Star-Crossed, The CW's The 100, Showtime's Penny Dreadful and the movie Marvel's Thor: The Dark World. He published a book called The Art of Language Invention (he shares his credentials in this video).
  • Paul Meehl, Philosophical Psychology 1989 course lectures, "deep introduction to 20c philosophy of science, using psychology rather than physics as the model science -- because it's harder!" (via @Jonathan Stray)
    • "Meehl was a philosopher of science, a statistician, and a lifelong clinical psychologist. He wrote a book showing that statistical prediction usually beats clinical judgement in 1954, and a paper on the replication crisis in psychology in 1978. He personally knew people like Popper, Kuhn, Lakatos, Feyerabend, etc. and brings their insights to life in these course lectures."
    • Me: I was hesitant to add a lecture series to this list at first. I changed my mind after listening to the first video, where Meehl provides interesting details (gossip, almost) about the life of an academic and the various personalities of his successful academic peers.
  • Kenneth Folk, Guided Tour to 13 Jhanas.
    • "Kenneth Folk is an instructor of meditation who has received worldwide acknowledgement for his innovative approach to secular Buddhist meditation. After twenty years of training in the Burmese Theravada Buddhist tradition of Mahasi Sayadaw, including three years of intensive silent retreat in monasteries in Asia and the U.S., he began to spread his own findings, successfully stripping away religious dogma to render meditation accessible to modern practitioners" (Website).
  1. ^

    What valuable project did they ship? How many years have they worked for their prestigious company or university? How many papers have they published? What awards have they won? What other domain-relevant metric did this person perform well on? You could also give your feedback based on your expertise. Ideally, these are proxies for the knowledge and expertise of these practitioners being good.

  2. ^

    Feel free to leave out the 'Background' and 'Why' sections.

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105 comments, sorted by Click to highlight new comments since: Today at 5:06 AM
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Pinned by Ben Pace

Requests Thread. Post requests for tacit knowledge videos below this comment.

This thread also serves as a memory jogger for those who might have seen videos of the requested types.

6Parker Conley16d
I would be interested in more studying/learning videos. I found Andy Matuschak's very interesting.
6Parker Conley16d
@Yoav Ravid: "I'd be interested in tacit knowledge videos about writing, if anyone knows any."
5Parker Conley2d
I would find forecasting videos would be interesting to watch.
3niplav2d
There's this intro series by @Alex Lawsen.
5Parker Conley4d
Fundraising videos?
3Parker Conley4d
@habryka / @mods - would it be possible to pin (1) the 'Review Thread' and (2) this thread? I think these will be the two most valuable comments on this post. The comment video submissions are a bit cluttered due to embeds and submissions are more accessible/navigatable through the OP.
2Ben Pace4d
Done.
3Parker Conley14d
Meal prepping Tacit Knowledge Videos?
3Parker Conley16d
I would be interested in hearing the thought processes behind experienced interviewers. For example, Tyler Cowen has a few blog posts speaking to his interviewing tacit knowledge. If there was something like this in a more information-dense video format, I would be keen to watch it.
2xepo4d
Interior design, please!  I can never figure out which pieces of furniture will actually look good together or flow nice in a home.  Especially when combined with lighting and shelves and art.  
1Parker Conley4d
Sales tacit knowledge videos?
1Parker Conley14d
Tacit Knowledge Videos of eurogames.
1Parker Conley16d
At one point I had watched a video on YouTube like Upright Citizens Brigade - ASSSSCAT Improv, but with the ASSSSCAT actors rewatching their performance and providing commentary on their thought processes. I would be delighted if anyone knows the original video or has a similar video they know of.
Pinned by Ben Pace

Review Thread. Post reviews of content linked above below this comment.

Review of: Elie Hassenfeld, Holden Karnofsky, Timothy Ogden, Rob Reich, Tom Rutledge, Brigid Slipka, Cari Tuna, Julia Wise: GiveWell's Public Board Meetings (2007–2020 have audio).

I'm a college student with only pretty low-stakes work experience. I listened to the first 5–10 meetings as I would a podcast last week. Some takeaways, emphasizing that I only just watched them last week:

  • It was interesting to follow the narrative of Holden and Elie getting started on the project. Like, anecdotes about people's experiences starting a startup are everywhere, but it was interesting hearing them actually talking about the struggles and business decisions they were making.
  • Holden worked 100h/wk in the first year; that's a lot of time spent on a project! (Then 60h/wk in the second, afaict.)
  • Interesting generally how assertive the business meetings were compared to everyday conversation.
  • I am familiar with GiveWell as a popular charity in the Rat/EA space, but I never really spent the time to understand the research methodology. It was interesting hearing the practical and strategic discussions between the founders and the board on the methodology. It also seemed to change every year in the f
... (read more)
[-]habryka19d1911

Share links to Tacit Knowledge Videos below! Share them frivolously! These videos are uncommon—the bottleneck to the YouTube knowledge transfer revolution is quantity, not quality. I will add the shared videos to the post. Here are the loose rules:

Note: I strongly recommend either changing this post to be a question (so that answers are more easily broken out), or enforcing a standard structure to comments to make the comments-section easy to skim. One of the things that was IMO most important for the success of the Best Textbooks On Every Subject thread were the requirements that each submission compared at least 3 textbooks, and that Luke kept editing the best submissions back into the main post body. 

7Parker Conley19d
Thank you for the recommendation! I think I agree. I will be editing the comments back into the body, but I think it would be useful for the comments to be more legible. For those reading this, here is the format I recommend (I've since edited this recommendation into the body):
1whestler4d
Domain: PCB Design, Electronics Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySuUZEjARPY Person: Rick Hartley Background: Has worked in electronics since the 60s, senior principal engineer at L-3 Avionics Systems, principal of RHartley Enterprises Why: Rick Hartley is capable of explaining electrical concepts intuitively, and linking them directly to circuit design. He uses a lot of stories and examples visually to describe what's happening in a circuit. I'm not sure it counts as Tacit Knowledge since this is lecture format, but it includes a bunch of things that you might not know you don't know, coming into the field. I never "got" how electrical circuits really work before watching this video, despite having been a hobbyist for years.

“Applied science” by Ben Krasnow.  A YouTube channel about building physics-intensive projects in a home laboratory.  Big ones are things like an electron microscope or a mass spectrometer, but the ones I find fascinating are smaller things like an electroluminescent display or a novel dye.  He demonstrates the whole process of scientific experiment— finding and understanding references, setting up a process for trying stuff, failing repeatedly, learning from mistakes, noticing oddities…  He doesn’t just show you the final polished procedure— “here’s how to make an X”.  He shows you the whole journey— “Here’s how I discovered how to make X”.

You seem very concerned that people in the videos should have legible symbols of success.  I don’t think that much affects how useful the videos are, but just in case I’m wrong, I looked on LinkedIn, where I found this self-assesment:

<begin copied text>

I specialize in the design and construction of electromechanical prototypes. My core skillset includes electronic circuit design, PCB layout, mechanical design, machining, and sensor/actuator selection. This allows me to implement and test ideas for rapid evalua... (read more)

7Algon19d
I'm gonna quote from this article about why you'd prefer to learn tacit knowledge from "believable people" i.e. those who have 1) a record of at least 3 different successes and 2) have great explanations of their approach when probed.   
1Parker Conley19d
Domain: Physics Link: "Applied Science" Person: Ben Krasnow Background: From his LinkedIn: "I specialize in the design and construction of electromechanical prototypes. My core skillset includes electronic circuit design, PCB layout, mechanical design, machining, and sensor/actuator selection. This allows me to implement and test ideas for rapid evaluation or iteration. Much of the work that I did for my research devices business included a fast timeline, going from customer sketch to final product in less than a month. These products were used to collect data for peer-reviewed scientific papers, and I enjoyed working closely with the end user to solve their data collection challenges. I did similar work at Valve to quickly implement and test internal prototypes." (I've since changed the formatting standards for this post; I hope you don't mind me reposting your information to make it more legible for new readers.)
1Parker Conley19d
Perfect—thanks for the links! Will add this and the other submission to the post when I get the chance. The main driving motivation for this was seeing that The Best Textbooks on Every Subject received traction due to a similar mechanism. Another reason was wanting the tacit knowledge in the videos to be knowledge that's appealing to learn. I don't want the mechanism to stop the post from receiving submissions though; this resource-submission genre seems like the kind that benefits from network effects. If anyone has any thoughts as to whether the mechanism is useful or counterproductive, I would be curious to hear.
1taygetea18d
That was 13 years ago across an ocean of accelerating cultural change, institutional trust, and people maturing. I'm sure you can still find plenty of people who would use mechanisms like that, but I'm pretty sure it's going to be one of the less important considerations now. 
1taygetea18d
and while I'm here, i also curate something like this. ben krasnow is only the best entry point into a wider world. This list was my best attempt recently, it was particularly aimed at getting programmers into physical engineering topics, trying to removing learned helplessness around it and making the topic feel like something it's possible to engage with. https://gist.github.com/taygetea/1fcc9817618b1008a812e6f2c58ca987
1Parker Conley16d
Thanks sharing sharing this! I've added one and intend to add more of them when I have more time.
[-]EZ9715d87

“American financial criminal and businessman. Shkreli is the co-founder of the hedge funds Elea Capital, MSMB Capital Management, and MSMB Healthcare, the co-founder and former CEO of pharmaceutical firms Retrophin and Turing Pharmaceuticals, and the former CEO of start-up software company Gödel Systems, which he founded in August 2016” (Wikipedia).


It should at least be mentioned that Shkreli is a convicted fraudster.

3Parker Conley15d
Agreed and added.

For home cooking I would like to recommend J. Kenji Lopez-Alt (https://www.youtube.com/@JKenjiLopezAlt/videos). He's a well-loved professional chef who writes science-y cooking books, and his youtube channel is a joy because it's mostly just low production values: him in his home kitchen, making delicious food from simple ingredients, just a few cuts to speed things up.

1Parker Conley14d
Thanks for sharing! Added. I'd be curious if anyone has this but for meal prepping instead of cooking a single meal.

I'd be interested in tacit knowledge videos about writing, if anyone knows any.

1Parker Conley16d
I've since created a requests thread where comments like these can go. Maybe the requests can serve as memory joggers for readers who've seen a certain type of Tacit Knowledge Video but don't recall the video after first reading the post.

Promoted to curated: The original "The Best Textbooks on Every Subject" post was among the most valuable that LessWrong has ever featured. I really like this extension of it into the realm of tacit knowledge videos, which does feel like a very valuable set of content that I haven't seen curated anywhere else on the internet.

Thank you very much for doing this! And I hope this post will see contributions for many months and years to come.

1Parker Conley5d
Glad to see that people find the post useful! I hope it will see many future contributions as well. In case interesting to anyone, I've just put together a google form to create an email list for those who would like to be sent lists of newly added videos every month or so.

Domain: Singing (especially theatre/musicals, but not just)

Link: Excerpt, full interview

Person: Philip Quast

Background: He played Javert in the 10th anniversary rendition of Les Mis.

Why: Philip Quast's has probably done the best performance of Javert, and in the interview he goes through the process of how he figures out how to sing his songs. 

1Parker Conley14d
Thanks! Added.

For math I'd like to submit this series: "A hard problem in elementary geometry" by fields medalist 
Timothy Gowers. It's a 6 part series where each part is about an hour long, of him trying to solve this easy-seeming-but-actually-very-difficult problem. 

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.
1aneeshm2d
Sir Gowers actually has a number of playlists around thinking about problems in real time; haven't looked at them myself, but may be worthwhile to mention that this series is one instance of multiple playlists of the same type, each focused on its own domain.

Sofia Bue is a professional SFX sculptor; she works at Weta Workshop which is the most well-known special FX company in the world; they were responsible for SFX on Lord of the Rings. She also won the SFX category at the world Bodypainting championships at least once so I think she’s pretty indisputably world-class at it.

Her entire YouTube channel demonstrates a tonne of her tacit knowledge with respect to sculpting and SFX in general, but this is one good example of her showing her work on a small sculpture:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1NwYbC5t-9w&pp=ygUJc29maWEgYnVl

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

A few channels on parenting and homemaking:

Lisa from a YouTube channel called Farmhouse on Boone walks through her house and discusses what items she keeps where and why, and how she avoids clutter. She is a mom of 8 with a successful YouTube channel (successful enough that her husband quit his job and now helps with the channel and homeschooling).

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5slnHqMG22Q&pp=ygUjZmFybWhvdXNlIG9uIGJvb25lIG1pbmltYWxpc3QgaG91c2U%3D

This woman (whose name I don’t know) is a Christian mom who homeschools her 8 children. In this video she wal... (read more)

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.
1wassname18d
Interesting, got anymore? Especially for toddlers and so on, or would you go through everything those women have uploaded?
1Freyja17d
Lisa doesn’t post much about parenting toddlers; she posts a bit about birth and newborns but the focus of her channel is more on cooking and homemaking and less on parenting IMO. I don’t know enough about the other woman’s channel to evaluate; I’ve only watched a few. A parent friend recommended the RIE parenting philosophy, and RIE has several demo videos of parents interacting with their kids according to the principles. I’ve watched a few; I think they’re searchable by keyword.
1wassname17d
Thanks!

an all around handyman (the Essential Craftsman on youtube) talking about how to move big/cumbersome things without injuring yourself:


the same guy, about using a ladder without hurting yourself: 


He has many other "tip" style videos. 

1Parker Conley19d
Thanks for sharing! Added to the post.

Juggling: Anthony Gatto's juggling routine from 2000. Anthony Gatto holds several juggling world records. This routine is infamous in the juggling world (here's a decent juggler commenting on it). As well as the fact that he gave up juggling to work with concrete instead (because it pays the bills). Here's more context on Gatto and his routine (the guy picking up the balls for him in the video is his father, for example):

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.
1Parker Conley19d
Domain: Juggling Link: Anthony Gato's juggling routine from 2000 Person: Anthony Gato Background: Anthony Gato holds several juggling world records. This routine is infamous in the juggling world (here's a decent juggler commenting on it). As well as the fact that he gave up juggling to work with concrete instead (because it pays the bills). Here's more context on Gatto and his routine (the guy picking up the balls for him in the video is his father, for example). (I've since changed the formatting standards for this post; I hope you don't mind me reposting your information to make it more legible for new readers.)

Domain: Philosophy of science

Link: Philosophical Psychology 1989 course lecturres

Person: Paul Meehl

Background: Deep introduction to 20c philosophy of science, using psychology rather than physics as the model science -- because it's harder!

Why: Meehl was a philosopher of science, a statistician, and a lifelong clinical psychologist. He wrote a book showing that statistical prediction usually beats clinical judgement in 1954, and a paper on the replication crisis in psychology in 1978. He personally knew people like Popper, Kuhn, Lakatos, Feyerabend, etc. a... (read more)

1Parker Conley3d
Thanks! Added. Relevant note from the entry:

This guy Lance has grown a prolific permaculture food garden in the high deserts of Colorado for the last (iirc) 40 years. It provides almost all his food, including grains and legumes. Here they do a walkthrough of the garden and he discusses how it works: https://youtu.be/i5yUPau-F1c?si=S6lRE4a2Ns9HujGJ

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

I don’t have one video to recommend for each topic, but YouTube is a great source of videos of giving birth and of related activities like breastfeeding, babywearing, and even holding a baby.

I think simply searching ‘birth video’ or ‘homebirth’, ‘hospital birth’ or something similar gets you enough such videos, and watching a bunch of different women give birth is probably better than watching a single ‘expert’.

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! I didn't add this as I couldn't readily think of a way to make it fit the format. But I've upvoted the comment to make it more visable.

There's some great opportunities here to learn social skills for various kinds of high-performance environments (e.g. "business communication" vs Y Combinator office hours). 

Often, just listening and paying attention to how they talk and think results in substantial improvement to social habits. I was looking for stuff like this around 2018, wish I had encountered a post like this; most people who are behind on this are surprisingly fast learners, but didn't because actually going out and accumulating social status was too much of a deep dive. There's no reason that being-pleasant-to-talk-with should be arcane knowledge (at least not here of all places).

2matto13d
Did you find anything interesting in 2018? Did you use it, and, if yes, how'd it go?

I think speedrunning videos should count, though many people may not find them useful. Likewise for watching high level competitions.

3Parker Conley19d
Agreed. I added the link to speedrun.com/games to the post. From there readers can navigate to individual games and their respective leaderboards, click on a player, and watch the player's speedrun YouTube video.

As someone who researches and trains tacit knowledge, I appreciate this effort. Wish I had some better public resources!

Watching Simon from Cracking the Cryptic has given me a good feel for how to solve a hard Sudoku. Not exactly revolutionary, but there's some really clever logic there. (Watching anyone think aloud as they do a task is going to be great for tacit knowledge)

https://youtu.be/hAyZ9K2EBF0?si=65SYQQSpE0V_m3ah

A really good debate between two people is another thing I would recommend to watch. You can learn a lot about rationality and rhetoric f... (read more)

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks Jared! I've added the channel as well as the book recommendation to the post.

[pasting a comment of mine on Zvi's recent monthly roundup]

If anyone has anecdotes as to why they think the videos have been useful to them I'd be curious to hear. I'm still unsure of their benefit; the interest could just be novelty/insight-porn (Andy Matuschak speculates something in this direction, though he too seems ambivalent). I wrote the post partly as a test to see if there is much use.

Do people really learn anything from these streams? People certainly claim to learn things from my note-writing stream. I can believe it, maybe, but I wonder to wha

... (read more)

Domain: Piano

Link: Seymour Bernstein Teaches Piano https://youtu.be/pRLBBJLX-dQ?si=-6EIvGDRyw0aJ0Sq

Person: Seymour Bernstein

Background: Pianist and composer, performed with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Adjunct Associate Professor of Music and Music Education at New York University.

Why: Tonebase (a paid music learning service) recorded a number of free to watch conversations with Bernstein while he plays through or teaches a piece. Bernstein is about 90 years old at the time of recording and shares an incredible amount of tacit knowledge, especially about body mechanics when playing piano.

1Parker Conley3d
Thanks! Added.

Interviews and kitchen walkthroughs with the head chefs at Michelin-star restaurants; I particularly like one with the head chef at a wild seafood restaurant demonstrating his daily ingredient procurement processes: https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUeEVLHfB5-T7E5TPxSphcDweIL5ioLrj

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

Esther Perel’s podcast called ‘Where Shall We Begin?’ where she does a live couples’ therapy session with a guest couple. It is rare to get access to a recorded therapy session, and she is at least world-renowned as a relationship therapist (although that doesn’t necessarily prove that she’s good at it).

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks, added!

Domain: Music composition / arrangement / production

Link: Logic Session Breakdowns playlist

Person: Jacob Collier

Background: 6-time (at 29 yo) Grammy-winning multi-instrumentalist.

Why: Most of the videos in the playlist are walkthroughs and commentary of the Logic sessions containing hit songs. The #IHarmU marathon (directly linked) is probably the best, featuring livestreamed music-making.

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

I'm not sure your choices of finance examples are particularly good

1Parker Conley19d
I was on the fence as to whether or not to include those.

The LessWrong Review runs every year to select the posts that have most stood the test of time. This post is not yet eligible for review, but will be at the end of 2025. The top fifty or so posts are featured prominently on the site throughout the year. Will this post make the top fifty?

Here’s a weird one.  The YouTube channel of Andrew Camarata communicates a great deal about small business, heavy machinery operation and construction. Some of it he narrates what he’s doing, but he mostly just does it, and you say “Oh, I never realized I could do that with a Skid Steer” or “that’s how to keep a customer happy”.  Lots of implicit knowledge about accomplishing heavy engineering projects between an hour and a week long.  Of course, if you‘re looking for lessons that would be helpful for an ambitious person in Silicon Valley, i... (read more)

1Parker Conley19d
Domain: Heavy Machinery Operation, Farming Link: FarmCraft101 Person: N/A Background: No legible symbols of success, other than speaking standard American English like he’s been to college, owning a large farm, and clearly being intelligent. Why: The channel is nice because he includes all his failures, and goes into articulate detail on how he debugged them.  I feel like learned some implicit knowledge about repair strategies. I particularly recommend the series of videos in which he purchases, accidentally sets on fire, and revives an ancient boom lift truck. (I've since changed the formatting standards for this post; I hope you don't mind me reposting your information to make it more legible for new readers.)
1Parker Conley19d
Domain: Small Business, Heavy Machinery Operation, Construction Link: Andrew Camarata Background: He has no legible success that I know of, except that he’s wealthy enough to afford many machines, and he’s smart enough that the house he designed and built came out stunning (albeit eccentric). Why: The YouTube channel of Andrew Camarata communicates a great deal about small business, heavy machinery operation and construction. Some of it he narrates what he’s doing, but he mostly just does it, and you say “Oh, I never realized I could do that with a Skid Steer” or “that’s how to keep a customer happy”.  Lots of implicit knowledge about accomplishing heavy engineering projects between an hour and a week long.  Of course, if you‘re looking for lessons that would be helpful for an ambitious person in Silicon Valley, it will only help in a very meta way.  (I've since changed the formatting standards for this post; I hope you don't mind me reposting your information to make it more legible for new readers.)

Domain: Farming Construction and Craftsmanship

Link: Simple off grid Cabin that anyone can build & afford: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOOXmfkXpkM (and many other builds on his channel)

Person: Dave Whipple

Background: Construction contractor, DIY living off-grid in Alaska and Michigan.

Why: He and his wife bootstrapped themselves building their own cabin, then house, sell at a profit, rinse and repeat a few times. There are many, many videos of people building their own cabins, etc. Dave's are simple, clear, lucid, from a guy who's done it many times and has skin in the game.

1Parker Conley3d
Thanks! Added.

Domain: Math and Game Dev

Link: Shaders for Game Devs

Person: Freya Holmer

Why: She shares a lot of practical knowledge about math and shaders in her streams. She explains not just what, but why, answering people's questions as she goes using her in-depth industry knowledge.

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

Domain: VFX

Link: Vfx artists react to bad & great cgi

Person: Corridor Crew

Why: They're skilled VFX artists reacting to good and bad VFX in movies. In doing so, they share tacit knowledge on compositing, lighting, 3D modelling, etc. They have lots of high profile guests from Seth Rogen to Adam Savage.

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

Domain: Combat Sports

Link: Muay Thai Library

Person: Sylvie Von Duuglas-Ittu

Background: Muay Thai fighter with over 200 fights.

Why: Sylvie shows herself learning with her 'Muay Thai Library' videos. She narrates how she explores learning someone's technique or strategy.

More than any particular technique, these videos show someone's learning process. This is applicable to all combat sports.

2Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.

Sofia Bue is a professional SFX sculptor; she works at Weta Workshop which is the most well-known special FX company in the world; they were responsible for SFX on Lord of the Rings. She also won the SFX category at the world Bodypainting championships at least once so I think she’s pretty indisputably world-class at it.

Her entire YouTube channel demonstrates a tonne of her tacit knowledge with respect to sculpting and SFX in general, but this is one good example of her showing her work on a small sculpture:

https://youtu.be/1NwYbC5t-9w?si=r0zGFKQXIiQkoLac

1Parker Conley16d
Thanks! Added.
[-]jsd19d20

Domain: Mathematics

Link: vEnhance

Person: Evan Chen

Background: math PhD student, math olympiad coach 

Why: Livestreams himself thinking about olympiad problems

5Neel Nanda12d
Oh nice, I didn't know Evan had a YouTube channel. He's one of the most renowned olympiad coaches and seems highly competent
1Parker Conley19d
Added, thanks! (x2)
[-]jsd19d20

Domain: Mathematics

Link: Thinking about math problems in real time

Person: Tim Gowers

Background: Fields medallist

Why: Livestreams himself thinking about math problems

1Parker Conley19d
Added, thanks!

For biology, JoVE ("Journal of Visual Experiments") is a very good source of videos like this. https://www.jove.com/ Unfortunately it's paywalled.

Domain: Farming, Construction, & Craftsmanship

Link:      https://www.youtube.com/@Advoko (English narration)

                https://www.youtube.com/user/advocatttt (Russian narration)

Person: Max Egorov

Background:       Unknown

Why:     Bushcraft and off-grid craftsmanship.  Advoko has a site in the woods near Lake Ladoga in Russia where he films himself building various improvements by hand with ... (read more)

Domain: Business & Business Communication, Mastering Difficult Conversations,  Coaching

Link: Misha Glouberman - Recorded Coaching Sessions

Person: Misha Glouberman (That's me)

Background: Consultant, Business Coach, and Co-Author of The Chairs Are Where The People Go.

Why: 

While there’s lots of reading materials on this kind of work, this recording offers the unique opportunity to actually listen and experience the coaching work and learnings happening in real-time. The concepts discussed can be applied to work-related, ... (read more)

I have a bunch that I like watching. I'll add more in separate comments as I remember, but some highlights for transportation are Reg Local for driving cars (former police driving instructor; he has a book, but the videos themselves are so helpful) and Missionary Bushpilot for flying small aircraft in Papua New Guinea (gorgeous shots, very careful pilot).

Tacit knowledge videos for CAD modelling:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzMIhOgu1Y5fwotlIEKNnuIXcEbVIZ7Qm

Domain: Linguistics

Link: [The Art of Language Invention, Episode 25: Ghost Segments]

Person: David J. Peterson

Background: Writer of many 'conlangs' (artificial languages) such as Dothraki from Game of Thrones

Why: 30+ part video-series about conlangs. In theory, it's meant as a resource to guide your own creation of a language. But it's also just a really good resource for absorbing how a linguist thinks about language. He talks about sounds/words/grammar, how they change over time, and what mechanisms are involved in that. IIRC he doesn't use very many tech... (read more)

1Parker Conley14d
I did not know 'conlangers' were a thing. Thanks for sharing and added.

Domain: Technology

Link: [https://youtube.com/@primitivetechnology9550](Primitive technology)

Person: Anon

Background: He became pretty famous, and published a book of the same name

Why: from youtube description "Primitive technology is a hobby where you make things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. This is the strict rule. If you want a fire- use fire sticks, an axe- pick up a stone and shape it, a hut- build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without modern technology."

1Parker Conley14d
Thanks for sharing! Added.

(sample comment, to set a standard for quality)

Domain: Video Editing

Link: World's Most Advanced Video Editing Tutorial (Premiere Pro)

Person: Taran Van Hemert

Background: "Editor, Camera Operator, Writer, Host at Linus Tech Tips" for ~10 years (Website).

Why: Incredibly in-depth look into Taran's video editing workflow for a YouTube channel with 15M subscribers.

2Parker Conley19d
(another one) Domain: Business, Business Communication Link: GiveWell's Public Board Meetings (2007–2020 have audio). People: Elie Hassenfeld, Holden Karnofsky, Timothy Ogden, Rob Reich, Tom Rutledge, Brigid Slipka, Cari Tuna, Julia Wise, and others. Backgrounds: * Holden Karnofsky. “Director of AI Strategy (formerly CEO) of Open Philanthropy and co-founder of GiveWell” (Website). * Elie Hassenfeld. co-founder and CEO of GiveWell (LinkedIn). * Timothy Ogden. Chief Knowledge Officer at Geneva Global, Inc.; founding editor of Gartner Press; founder of Sona Partners; chairman of GiveWell (Aspen Institute). * Rob Reich. Political Science professor at Stanford for 26 years (Stanford). * Tom Rutledge. Has worked in finance since 1989 (LinkedIn).  * Brigid Sliplka. Director of Philanthropy at ACLU (LinkedIn). * Cari Tuna. President at Open Philanthropy and Good Ventures (Wikipedia). * Julia Wise. Community Liaison at Centre for Effective Altruism (LinkedIn). Why: I've personally found it interesting to listen to these meetings for generally instantiating "what actually is a board meeting?". They can be listened to just like you would listen to a podcast, in a multi-tasking sort of way.